Learned much from tax break editorial


first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion The Nov. 12 editorial by The Daily Gazette, “Keep deduction for teacher supplies in budget,” was an perfect example of what an editorial should strive to do. The media coverage of the federal tax plan has focused on the politics of whether the bill will pass or not. I was unaware of this important aspect of the tax plan, as it hasn’t been part of the debate.I suspect that many supporters of the tax plan are also unaware of the provision to eliminate the deduction for school supplies. The Daily Gazette’s editorial provided a deeper context of the tax plan’s ramifications for children.I also applaud that the editorial suggested its readers take action by calling their congressman. The Daily Gazette cited key points regarding the issue to inform its readers so they are able to intelligently argue the case to keep the deduction.The Daily Gazette’s editorial has four important components: It describes a problem school districts face in poor communities; it explains how this tax plan will make those situations worse; it informs the reader of an under reported issue; and finally it encourages the reader to take action that can make a difference.WILLIAM AIKENSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Schenectady’s Lucas Rodriguez forging his own path in dance, theater, musicEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationSchenectady NAACP calls for school layoff freeze, reinstatement of positionsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homeslast_img read more

Human CO2 upsets balance in atmosphere


first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionIn regards to Roger Anderson’s Feb. 18 letter, it’s important to note that he’s leaving out vital information and when it comes to human CO2 [carbon dioxide] emissions and their impact on the atmosphere. While it’s true that human emissions are small in comparison to natural emissions, their impacts are anything but. There is, and always has been, a natural carbon cycle in nature that balances out the levels of CO2 in the atmosphere. CO2 is created, whether by decomposition of organic material or hydrothermal vents, and then absorbed into the ocean or is converted into O2 via photosynthesis. This created a balance, an ebb and flow if you will.However, after the industrial revolution, the amount of CO2 humans have pumped into the atmosphere is just enough to offset that balance. The actual measurement of human CO2 emissions is around nine billion tons, as opposed to his claim of eight billion. This is still small by comparison to natural CO2 emissions, but only 40 percent of that additional CO2 will be absorbed through the natural cycle. The remaining 60 percent of human emissions remains in our atmosphere (Tripati 2009).So, think of the carbon cycle as a camel and the amount of carbon naturally produced as the load its spine can stand to bear. Human emissions are the straw, and we all know what happened to the camel’s back.John ShortGlenvilleThe writer is a biologist and an environmental educator.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?last_img read more

Letters to the Editor for Monday, Dec. 9


first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionAmericans must stand up to bulliesAfter seeing overwhelming evidence that our current president committed a crime, one that even loyal Republicans don’t dispute, these same Republicans are looking for ways to say there’s nothing there.It’s as if the bully in the schoolyard stole their collective lunch money — that is their oath of office, loyalty to the Constitution and duty to country — and they don’t know how to get it back.My suggestion is do what we tell our children to do: “Stand up to the bully.” Bullies are cowards and rely on not being challenged.They use scare tactics and threats and in the end they tum tail and run.Sometimes they enlist an older kid for support, or they hurl verbal attacks or tweets. That’s their cover and how they get their way.My experience from playground to adulthood, if you give in, the behavior worsens, the stakes get higher. If you stand up, there’s a good chance the bully will back down.Having grown up during the Cold War, I’ve seen this played out on the world stage. Russia (USSR) was often the bully. But we as a country recognized the threat and stood up for ourselves and our allies.We have a president who seems to be conflicted in his loyalties. He’d prefer to side with the global bully rather than challenge him for whatever reason.It’s up to us, citizens of this democracy, to stand up to the bully and encourage our lawmakers, both Republicans and Democrats, to do the same.Barbara J. StowellCentral BridgeWhy bother to clear snow off sidewalks?On the complaint of homeowners not clearing their sidewalks, I live in the Mont Pleasant area, and people do not use the sidewalks in good weather.They walk in the middle of the street in July when there is no snow on sidewalks. Walkers take their time strolling in middle of the streets holding up traffic.I wonder if they know what the cement strip on the side of the road is for.The best is when parent(s) stroll their babies in carriages in the middle of the street. Are you kidding me? What are these parents thinking strolling along in the street with baby carriages? Don’t they care about their babies? That should be child abuse, since everything is child abuse these days.As for not clearing sidewalks: Why would I bother, since people do not use the sidewalks?Where are my neighbors? No one offered even to help those who can’t shovel. I’d rather they slip on the city streets that aren’t plowed.Albert ZangerSchenectadyClear all city streets right up to the curbThe Daily Gazette’s Dec. 3 article titled, “City begins towing illegally-parked vehicles” was truly one of the funniest pieces of written comedy I’ve had the occasion to read in a good, long while. The article quoted the city of Schenectady’s “Priority Street Plowing” program, with a paragraph stating, “Vehicles may return only after the ‘entire length of the street has been cleared of snow back to the curb.’”What a hoot. I haven’t seen a curb after a snowfall in over 20 years, except where the homeowners themselves clear the street. The snow is usually more than two feet from the curb.One glaring exception is on Chrisler Avenue at the intersection of Altamont Avenue, if you happen to want to make a right-turn onto Altamont toward the railroad bridge, you have to do it from the center lane; the right hand lane is mostly a fantasy.And to harken back to a letter I wrote last winter, yes, the plows are still going too fast on Guilderland Avenue and burying the recently cleared sidewalks, so why should we even bother shoveling?Growing up in Schenectady, I remember the huge snowblowers attached to trucks and how they really cleaned the streets.I know that parts got scarce, the machines deteriorated and were never replaced, and that clearing the streets to the curbs in residential neighborhoods just doesn’t happen anymore. All the street should be cleared to the curbs, or don’t even bring it up.Kurt C. SiegelSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?last_img read more

Occupiers count the cost of foot-and-mouth


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Inner City


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Retail rebirth


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Victoria House plans revealed


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PREMIUMMinistry demands Jakarta revise LRT plan to avoid overlap with MRT


first_imgGoogle Topics : Log in with your social account Facebook The government has told the Jakarta administration to revise its plans for the east-west line of the light rapid transit (LRT), saying the route, as currently planned, overlapped with that of the MRT.The revision, the government said, should make the LRT a supporting system for the MRT as the backbone of public transportation in the city. Thus, LRT passengers could continue their trips using the MRT and vice versa.The Jakarta administration planned to construct the second line of the LRT Jakarta from Kebayoran Lama in South Jakarta to Pulogadung in East Jakarta, a stretch of 19.7 kilometers.The fully elevated corridor would serve Perintis Kemerdekaan in East Jakarta, Suprapto, Senen, Tugu Tani, Kebon Sirih, Sarinah and Tanah Abang in Central Jakarta as well as KS Tubun in West Jakarta.At the end of 2019, however, the central government through the Transportation Ministry … Forgot Password ? Linkedin LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here LRT-Jakarta MRT-Jakarta Transportation public-transportation rail-project railway Greater-Jakarta traffic commuterslast_img read more

Japan reports two more virus-linked deaths, urges public events cancelled


first_img“In light of the significant infection risks, we will ask that national sporting or cultural events that will attract large crowds be either cancelled, postponed or downsized for the next two weeks,” Prime Minister Shinzo Abe told a cabinet task force meeting on the outbreak.Workers in protective clothes stand before passengers disembarking off the Diamond Princess cruise ship, in quarantine due to fears of new COVID-19 coronavirus, at Daikoku pier cruise terminal in Yokohama on February 21, 2020. ( AFP/Philip FONG)-Concerts cancelled After the announcement, the Nippon Professional Baseball Organization said its unofficial spring games through March 15 would be held in empty stadiums before the official season opens on March 20.Some top Japanese musicians — including all-male group Exile and female trio Perfume — cancelled concerts, while the Tokyo Girls Collection fashion show on Saturday will be held with no audience, according to their organisers.The virus has also forced professional football, rugby, golf, tennis and other sports to reschedule games or to hold events with no fans in attendance.The sumo association will hold an emergency board meeting on Sunday to discuss whether to hold their sold-out March tournament in Osaka in western Japan.The government has also asked state-operated museums and theatres to consider closing or cancelling shows.Abe and cabinet ministers have repeatedly said that the coming weeks will be critical in limiting the spread of the virus in Japan.But those measures have been largely advisory, including recommending that people work from home or commute off-peak.The governor of Hokkaido, where at least 38 people have been diagnosed, said he was asking local municipalities to close public schools for one week from Thursday.In Tokyo, meanwhile, the regional education board said public high schools could start late to spare students travelling on packed commuter trains.The outbreak has raised fears that the Olympic Games to be hosted in Tokyo this summer could be cancelled, a possibility government officials and organisers have rejected.”We have not thought about it. We have not heard about it. We have made inquiries, and we were told there is no such plan,” Tokyo 2020 CEO Toshiro Muto told reporters.”Our basic thinking is to conduct the Olympics and Paralympics as planned. That’s our assumption.”Along with at least 165 infections across the country, Japan has dealt with lingering worries about those who disembarked from the virus-hit Diamond Princess cruise ship.The government has contacted 813 former passengers of the ship and found “45 people had certain symptoms”, Health Minister Katsunobu Kato told parliament.”We asked all of them (who have symptoms) to see a doctor and to take tests.”Japan has come under increasing pressure over its handling of the crisis on the vessel.Those allowed off the ship after a 14-day quarantine were asked to stay inside, but no formal measures restricting their movement were imposed.Around 970 people were allowed off the boat last week after testing negative for the virus, but several have subsequently been diagnosed with the illness.Opposition lawmakers have blamed the government for failing to implement a fresh 14-day quarantine after the passengers left the cruise ship — as was required by countries that repatriated citizens from the boat.Topics : He had not travelled to China recently and there was no sign he had contact with known infected individuals, it said in a statement.Another elderly person in the Hokkaido region of northern Japan died of viral pneumonia, the ministry said.Testing done after the death confirmed the infection of the individual, whose details have not been released at the request of the family.Seven deaths linked to the virus have now been reported in Japan — four of them former passengers from the Diamond Princess — while the country has also recorded more than 700 infections from the boat and at least 160 off it. Japan reported two more deaths linked to the coronavirus Wednesday as the government called for organisers to reconsider holding major events in coming weeks to limit the outbreak.The news came as dozens of passengers allowed off a virus-stricken cruise ship were reported to have developed symptoms including fever, and will be asked to be re-tested for the virus.A Tokyo man in his 80s who tested positive for the infection died of pneumonia, the health ministry said.last_img read more

Tangerang police arrest 11 union members over alleged incitement during omnibus protest


first_imgRead also: Key points of labor reform in omnibus bill on job creation: What we know so farNining has called for the police to release the 11 union members and not to arrest more labor union members for provocation to avoid further “social disturbance”.“The arrests were arbitrary,” she added. “It happened in the middle of the night as if they were corruption suspects.”At the time of reporting, the KASBI advocacy team and union leaders are in mediation with the Tangerang Regency police.The police did not immediately respond to the Post’s request for an interview.On Feb. 17, an unknown group of people staged a protest without any prior notice at the KASBI secretariat in Pulo Gadung district, East Jakarta.The protesters spoke briefly spoke about the omnibus bill before they started burning tires and demanding KASBI be dissolved, according to Nining.“This is an act of terror against our unions. We believe that this [protest] occurred because of our stance on the omnibus bill,” she said on Feb. 17.The government considers the bill on job creation essential for attracting foreign investment to help improve economic growth and boost the nation’s ease of doing business. If passed, the omnibus bill would amend about 1,200 articles in more than 80 prevailing laws.Read also: Guide to omnibus bill on job creation: 1,028 pages in 10 minutesWorkers, however, have been campaigning firmly against the bill, having held demonstrations since January. They rejected the omnibus bill after rumors surfaced that it would reduce severance payments, enforce an hourly pay system to replace the minimum wage and eliminate sanctions against companies that failed to provide health insurance.The government has formed a consultative team consisting of government officials, businesspeople and labor representatives to discuss the bill.However, major labor groups including the KASBI, the Confederation of Indonesian Trade Unions (KSPI) and the All-Indonesia Workers Union Confederation (KSPSI) have declined to join the coordination team. Topics : Seven of the 11 union members are KASBI members and the remaining two are members of the All-Indonesia Workers’ Union (SPSI).“They were picked up by the police between 1 a.m. and 3 a.m. when they were coming home from the night shift at their respective workplaces,” the chairwoman said over the phone.She said the police suspected them of “provocation” during several labor union protests against the omnibus bill on job creation.According to Article 160 of the Criminal Code (KUHP), the arrested union members could face up to six years in prison if found guilty of incitement. The Tangerang regency police have taken 11 labor union members into custody for alleged incitement during protests over the omnibus bill on job creation.Congress Alliance of Indonesian Labor Unions (KASBI) chairwoman Nining Elitos told The Jakarta Post that two of the detainees were KASBI administrators, namely Joe, also known as Imron, and Siswoyo.  Read also: Labor unions protest Jokowi’s omnibus billlast_img read more