11 01 20

first_img 165Let’s talk business.Catch up on the business news closest to you with our daily newsletter. Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! SANTA FE SPRINGS — Coroner’s officials on Tuesday identified a 3-year-old boy who was killed when his father’s sports utility vehicle accidentally ran over the child Monday evening in what investigators were calling a tragic accident. The boy, identified as Maximino Torres Jr., apparently ran in front of his father’s 2003 Cadillac Escalade, which was just beginning to pull forward in the driveway of the family’s home in the 11600 block of Laurel Avenue shortly after 5 p.m., California Highway Patrol Officer Raquel Stage said. The toddler suffered major head trauma and died at the scene. An autopsy for the 3-year-old Santa Fe Springs boy was expected to be conducted Wednesday, coroner’s spokesman Craig Harvey said. Stage said the father had not been arrested or cited as of Tuesday, although an investigation was continuing. She said a preliminary investigation appeared to show that the father was not at fault. “The initial investigation suggests it’s just a tragic accident, a matter of the baby running out and the dad not seeing him,” said Stage. “It’s just an unfortunate accident.”last_img read more

11 01 20

first_imgLos Angeles Police Chief William Bratton should definitely be replaced — but only because L.A. needs a top cop who won’t wimp out when it comes to defending the officers who justifiably cleared the illegal protesters out of MacArthur Park on May 1. Although protesters were permitted to stay at the park until 9 p.m. that evening, they forfeited that right by throwing rocks and plastic bottles at police officers. The LAPD then issued a legal dispersal order, which the protesters ignored, some violently. When protesters are assembled illegally, when they threaten public order, assault the police and refuse repeated requests to cease and desist, they leave law enforcement no choice but to forcibly remove them. That is what the Los Angles Police Department did on May 1, and with commendable restraint. As far as the minimal roughing-up received by some participants and journalists, that was strictly the result of their personal choice to repeatedly defy the law. Having a camera or a microphone is no license to refuse to cooperate when law enforcement is trying to restore law and order. To label as “brutality” such a minimal, restrained, and justified police action is ludicrous. So why, then, did Chief Bratton apologize for the action? What happened to the tough New York transplant whom most law-abiding Angelenos were counting on to bring back law and order when he was hired five years ago? He wasn’t here last week. Maybe it’s because Bratton is up for reappointment, and he doesn’t want to risk offending anybody — even if that means not speaking the truth or sticking up for the men and women under his command. So Bratton produced the obligatory, humiliating apology. He expressed “grave concern” over his officers’ conduct, calling it “inappropriate.” And he criticized the cops’ use of foam bullets to quell the crowd, saying, “Two hundred and forty rounds with no arrests is of grave concern to me.” All this for what, by all appearances, was an entirely justified and needed police action. Bratton has played his last card, and he needs to be replaced, all right. Because he obviously wants the chief’s job too badly to stand up and speak honestly about why Los Angeles can’t get a handle on its primary law enforcement problems. This is a problem that started well before May 1. Bratton has, for years, refused to speak out against a city government that condones the illegal immigration that’s destroying L.A.’s future. He has, for years, refused to speak out against a City Council that first directs him to beautify the Skid Row area, and then refuses to support his attempts to remove the unrepentant, hard-core addicts and criminals who don’t want to be rehabilitated, and who populate the area. He has, for years, refused to denounce the inept leadership of the Los Angeles Unified School District, which is unable to control its 700,000 students, and then blames a lack of law enforcement for the violent and lawless meltdowns occurring on most campuses. Worst of all, Bratton has refused to speak out against Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa’s dangerous inability to develop an effective gang-prevention plan. Los Angeles’ worst nightmare is fighting to unleash itself on the city. The apocalypse-waiting-to-happen is L.A.’s toxic mixture of 150,000 gang members, tens of thousands of returning prison parolees, streets flowing with weapons and drugs, a limitless influx of illegal-immigrant young males, a high-school dropout rate of 50 percent, and worldwide terrorist operations flush with cash and anti-American sentiment. The Thin Blue Line is all that stands between us and this nightmare, and that line is being steadily erased by an unopposed handful of dissidents. If L.A. is to have a future, it must start with fair, but very tough law enforcement. That requires a chief who’s willing to demand support from the mayor and the City Council. Chief Bratton could have been L.A.’s Braveheart — the strong, inspiring, stand-up law enforcement leader we sorely need. But he gave up on that effort to try and get job longevity. Ironically, he’ll probably end up with neither one.— Paul D. White is the co-founder of West Valley Leadership Academy in Canoga Park and the author of “White’s Rules: Saving Our Youth One Kid at a Time.” Write to him by e-mail at white.paul@roadrunner.com.last_img read more

11 01 20

first_img165Let’s talk business.Catch up on the business news closest to you with our daily newsletter. Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! “The suspect had altered his appearance significantly,” Dyer said. “He shaved his head and also changed his clothing apparently in an attempt to avoid being recognized.”The Fresno County Coroner’s Office identified the deceased victim as a Brant Daniels, 19, who had moved from the Los Angeles area to attend Fresno State but was not a current student.Police identified the two wounded men as Fresno State student Roderick Buycks, 19, and Drew Pfeiff, 22, who is not enrolled at the university.Fresno State students were never in danger because police were in contact with the gunman and knew he was not on campus, Dyer said.Police were searching for evidence, including the gun, at six apartments at University Village Apartments. Police arrested college student Tuesday suspected of opening fire at an apartment during a dispute over a video game console, killing one man and wounding two others. Jonquel Brooks, 19, was taken into custody after a series of intense phone negotiations with police, his parents and an attorney, Fresno Police Chief Jerry Dyer said.Police said the shooting across a street from the California State University, Fresno, stadium broke out during a confrontation with four men over a Playstation game console late Monday.Brooks, who was majoring in criminology at Fresno State, was arrested after police and federal agents launched a manhunt for him. Investigators initially believed he was still inside the apartment complex where the shooting occurred, but then expanded the search to other parts of Fresno.last_img read more

11 01 20

first_imgAnalysts viewed the minor changes in the Fed’s announcement as a signal that the central bank is not likely to change rates any time soon. “This statement signals no change for awhile,” said David Jones, head of DMJ Advisors, a private forecasting firm. Jones said he still believes the Fed’s next move will be a rate cut, but perhaps only a one quarter-point reduction late in the year after inflation has eased further in response to a weaker job market. The Fed’s last rate change occurred nearly a year ago – on June 29, 2006 – when the funds rate was increased for a 17th straight time. That capped a two-year period in which the central bank pushed the funds rate up from a 46-year low of 1 percent in an effort to slow the economy enough to restrain rising inflation pressures without pushing the country into a recession. The latest decision, which was announced after the Fed’s regular closed-door discussions, meant that the prime rate, the benchmark for millions of consumer and business loans, will remain unchanged at 8.25 percent. So far, the Fed’s plan seems to be working to slow economic growth and lower inflation pressures. But the steep slide in the once-booming housing sector has raised concerns among some economists that the slowdown could worsen into a more severe downturn. The Fed made only small changes in its brief statement commenting on current economic conditions. It stated that “economic growth slowed in the first part of this year” rather than saying that economic conditions were mixed, the way it had described the economy at its March meeting. But it continued to signal that its major concern was inflation, restating previous wording that the Fed’s “predominant policy concern remains the risk that inflation will fail to moderate as expected.” Economic growth, as measured by the gross domestic product, slowed in the January-March quarter to an annual rate of 1.3 percent, the weakest performance in four years, while the jobless rate inched up to 4.5 percent in April as businesses created just 88,000 new jobs. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! WASHINGTON – The Federal Reserve left a key interest rate unchanged on Wednesday as the economy signaled that it was on track for a soft landing in which growth slows enough to restrain inflation. Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke and his colleagues voted to keep the federal funds rate, the interest that banks charge each other, at 5.25 percent. It marked the seventh straight meeting at which the Fed has kept rates steady. The decision had been widely expected, but some Wall Street investors were still disappointed that the Fed did not modify its worries about inflation given recent data showing price pressures have eased a bit. The Dow Jones industrial average, which had spiked right before the announcement, at first dropped on the announcement but then made up the lost ground. It closed up 53.80 at a record 13,362.87. It is the index’s 21st record close this year. last_img read more

11 01 20

first_imgWhile the virus can be spread through unprotected sex and shared needles, experts say most Asians become infected through their mothers during birth or in childhood. A vaccine can actually knock down the disease after it is contracted if administered at young enough an age. The Herald Cancer Association in San Gabriel relies on funding from foundations, medical centers and drug companies to sponsor outreach programs, which are held in Mandarin and English. “Without the help of the government, we’re just a nonprofit at the mercy of pharmaceuticals, whether they will give us the grant or not,” said the Rev. David Lee, director of the Christian-based association. At a screening event in October, more than one out of 10 participants tested positive for the virus. Follow-up is crucial for carriers, said Lee, who was diagnosed as a carrier in his late teens. To compare Chi Mui and Lee, the difference early detection makes is life or death. Like Mui, Lee, 47, said he realized he was infected when he first tried to donate blood as a young man. Based on the science back then, he was told not to worry about it. But Lee had half his liver removed at 34, after doctors discovered a tumor. Mui was less fortunate. He was caught up with campaigning for City Council, said Mui’s widow, Betty Mui. After two years without tests, doctors found an 8cm liver tumor. The cancer later spread to his pelvic bone. “It developed so fast,” said Betty Mui, who is now a key volunteer at Herald Cancer Association. She also contracted the virus at a young age and gets regular blood tests and ultrasound screenings. “People have to be very careful about it.” Hepatitis B can go undiagnosed. Carriers usually have no symptoms and appear healthy. It may not show up on tests for liver function, and doctors don’t always think to order specific blood work to test for it, Lee said. By the time patients notice the yellow eyes and swollen bellies associated with cirrhosis, or the vague upper abdominal pain that may indicate liver cancer, their problems are at an advanced stage. Treatment of liver disease is complicated and risky; transplants are hard to come by. “We feel that in the Chinese community, knowledge is spreading,” said Lucy Young, Herald’s cancer projects director. “We receive quite a few phone calls about when we will do blood tests again, vaccinate again.” The programs are on hiatus while funding is sought. Three shots costing as much as $60 each are required for vaccination. The association also works with community groups in San Diego and Orange counties. “We still have a lot of work to do, not only in San Gabriel Valley,” Young said. “Those carriers, most of them are in the underserved population. Either they don’t have insurance coverage or they don’t know where to go for follow-up.” The hepatitis B vaccine was introduced in the early 1980s. Since the early ’90s, it has been administered to most infants born in the United States. In California, vaccination is required for entry to kindergarten and the seventh grade, said Laurene Mascola, who heads Los Angeles County’s Acute Communicable Disease Control Program. The county’s hepatitis B efforts center on vaccinating infants and tracking pregnant women who have HBV, and high-risk behavior groups such as jail populations and gay men. Nonetheless, some health care professionals are eagerly awaiting the outcome of a bill currently making its way through the state Assembly. “This is something near and dear to my heart,” said the bill’s author, Assemblywoman Fiona Ma, D-San Francisco. She contracted the virus from her mother. Without screening and management, one in four with the virus will die from liver cancer or cirrhosis, according to the Asian Liver Center. San Francisco launched a campaign in April to test and vaccinate all its Asian residents for hepatitis B, a combined effort by the city government, private healthcare and community organizations. AB 158 was passed in the Assembly Health Committee in April, the first of several hurdles it must clear before it can land on the governor’s desk in the fall. “It is a public health concern; it deserves funds from legislative avenues,” said Jeff Goad, an associate professor of clinical pharmacy at USC and a member of a hepatitis B taskforce. “There is not a lot of action to fund treatment and management. The government … allows the private system to handle treatment, but that doesn’t always happen.” One of the organizations that stands to benefit from the bill is St. Vincent Medical Center in Los Angeles. The hospital is opening a center in July that will deal specifically with hepatitis in Asians and could receive some of the $4 million the bill proposes. “I don’t think there is a recognition even among physicians of the magnitude of the problem among Asians,” said Tse-Ling Fong, a liver specialist who will direct the Asian Pacific Liver Center. Fong said the center will target Asians 18 and older, particularly those born overseas. In keeping with the hospital’s charitable care policy, the center will accept both insured and uninsured patients. “My hope is that three or four generations from now, hepatitis B will be something like smallpox that we no longer talk about,” Fong said. patricia.ho@sgvn.com (626) 578-6300, Ext. 4586 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! As an Asian-American politician, Chi Mui was part of an elite new group of leaders. He became San Gabriel’s first Asian mayor in March 2006. As an Asian, Mui belonged to a larger, more disturbing health care demographic. He died of liver cancer after about a month in the position, at 53. Mui had hepatitis B, a disease that can be prevented and that is dubbed a “silent killer” that affects a disproportionate number of Asians. The virus puts them at greater risk of developing liver cancer and cirrhosis. The HBV-related death rate among Asian Americans is seven times greater than the rate among American whites, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Race-specific attention to the virus consists so far of patchwork efforts by nonprofits, some of which piece together funding sources for workshops, screening fairs and vaccinations. Health care workers say a more comprehensive approach is needed. “Hepatitis B and liver cancer is the greatest health care disparity,” said the center’s director, Dr. Sammy So. “Almost every Asian knows of someone who died from liver cancer.” Chronic hepatitis B infection affects 0.3 percent of the U.S. population, but Asians make up more than half, or roughly 700,000, of the known hepatitis B carriers, according to the Asian Liver Center at Stanford University. Most contract the virus overseas, and many are unaware they have it. Of the HBV-positive women who gave birth in Los Angeles County in 2005, 81 percent were Asian, according to the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. Nearly 50 percent were from the San Gabriel Valley. last_img read more

11 01 20

first_img The money will come in handy, said Steve Forster, La Mirada’s public works director. “What has happened over the years is that we had corrugated metal pipes used in the storm drain system. They were supposed to have a life of 20 years, but many have been in place for 50 years,” he said. Some of the pipes already are beginning to deteriorate and may need relining or to be replaced entirely, he said. Some minor failures have already occurred – on Figures Street and on Greenworth Drive, he added. The city already has contracted the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to do a study of 11 potentially flood-prone sites and to make recommendations to improve drainage. Most of the sites are in the southern part of La Mirada, although one is in the Foster Road area and another is near Creek Park. LA MIRADA – U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer and Rep. Linda Sanchez are very near to securing $4 million in federal funds to help alleviate flooding in this city. Boxer, D-CA, helped put the $4 million authorization of federal funds into the Water Resources Development Act passed this week in the Senate by a vote of 91-4. Members of the Senate and the House of Representatives will need to meet in a conference committee to work out any differences between their respective water resources bills. The final bill would then need to be passed by both chambers before going to the president. “This vote opens the door for bringing federal investments home for an innovative flood control system that will help protect homes in La Mirada from flood damage while also enhancing our environment,” Sanchez, D-Lakewood, said in a statement. “This project will demonstrate that even small changes in the way we build our communities can create lasting benefits.” The $248,000 study is expected to be completed by the end of this year, Forster said. The next step will be a more formalized planning process — and for the city to come up with money to pay for the improvements. While Foster was unsure of the total cost, the $4 million in federal aid will help, he said. Sanchez praised Boxer for her help in securing the funding. “I am especially grateful for the leadership of Sen. Barbara Boxer in making this happen,” she said in her statement.165Let’s talk business.Catch up on the business news closest to you with our daily newsletter. Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

11 01 20

first_imgIt noted that previous changes to the province’s funding formula position remain in place, and as a result, parents are being reminded there’s still a distinct possibility bussing fees could become a reality and be put in place as early September of this year.The phased-in changes have left the school district with a reworked funding shortfall of about $400,000 for the transportation system, and it says over the past year – without any success to date – it has continued to press the province to revisit the issue.In the meantime, the school board continues to search for a fair remedial solution and now says it hopes to have a decision in that regard over the next month.- Advertisement -“It’s basically a placeholder announcement to let parents know we’re still thinking about this – we’re still working on this – and if we can’t find a solution that works for us financially to provide free bussing, the possibility of fees is still on the table,” says Superintendent of SD 60 Dave Sloan.Sloan adds, “The previous board had passed that and was looking at it, and of course we got an 11th hour rescue from our associates in the Regional District, Hudson’s Hope and Taylor last time.”He says the board does not expect the same type of financial rescue this time around.Advertisement Sloan also points out what was proposed prior to the rural partners rescue must now be re-examined.“How do you implement this in a fair manner?” Sloan asks. “Is it per child? Is it per family? All of that will be subject to further review.”The initial proposal called for $200.00 dollars per student, per school year with a cap of $500.00 per family.Geographically speaking, School District 60 is one of the largest in the province and provides services to an area approximately the size of New Brunswick in the neighbourhood of 20,000 square miles.Advertisementlast_img read more

11 01 20

first_imgPremier Christy Clark and Ministry of Health announced today a new four-year strategy for magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, to help health authorities increase patient access to MRI scans.“We recognize that access to MRIs has been a challenge and this strategy will make sure we better meet the health care needs of British Columbians now and into the future,” said Health Minister Terry Lake. “By improving how we manage MRI diagnostics, we can provide families with peace of mind that comes with faster diagnosis and treatment.”Budget allocations for MRIs will increase correspondingly, providing up to an additional $20 million in annual funding for these services by the fourth year.- Advertisement -As for here in Northern BC, there is no confirmation of action just yet, but Northern Health is working with the ministry to see what they can do for communities that do not have MRI services.“Northern Health is currently in the request for information stage, looking at how we can support northeast and northwest BC with MRI services,” said Jonathon Dyck of Northern Health, adding that the demand for more MRI services has been increasing ‘dramatically’ across BC.Right now, the only MRI clinic in this region is in Dawson Creek. Queen Elizabeth II hospital in Grande Prairie also offers MRIs.Advertisement This MRI strategy takes a two-pronged approach; the first priority is to increase the number of scans — resulting in up to 65,000 annually by the time the strategy has run it’s course.Health authorities have also committed to increase the number of MRI exams performed annually by 45 per cent.Over the past decade, BC has acquired 16 new MRI scanners for hospitals, for a total of 25 – a 178% increase; the number of MRIs performed went from 67,030 (2004-05) to over 143,000 (2014-15) .last_img read more

10 01 20

first_img0Shares0000English topflight clubs generated record revenues of £3.6bn, a 9% increase, in the final year of the league’s 2013-16 broadcast cycle © AFP/File / PAUL ELLISPARIS, France, Jul 12 – The 92 Premier League and Football League clubs recorded combined revenues in excess of £4.4 billion ($5.7bn, 4.9bn euros) in the 2015/16 season, according to consultants Deloitte.English topflight clubs generated record revenues of £3.6bn, a 9% increase, in the final year of the league’s 2013-16 broadcast cycle, the firm said in its annual review of football finance. Revenus will continue to rise in the 2017/18 season, the review forecast. Wage costs rose to 12% to £2.3bn and the Premier League showed little sign of austerity, with its 20 clubs recording a third consecutive season of operating profits in excess of £500m in the 2015/16 season.Dan Jones, partner in Deloitte’s Sports Business Group, said top clubs did well out of European competition.“In the 2015/16 season, the ‘big six’ clubs participated in the group stages of UEFA competitions and benefitted from improved UEFA broadcast rights deals, which resulted in an increase in distributions to participating English clubs of around £100m,” he said.Deloitte forecasts “total Premier League clubs’ revenues to rise to over £4.5 billion in 2017/18.”Newly-promoted Huddersfield Town will benefit from the windfall “with clubs standing to earn a revenue uplift of at least £170m from promotion to the Premier League, rising to over £290m if they survive one season.”The Premier League continues to boom after competition between Sky Sports and BT drove the overall value for domestic TV rights for the 2016-19 cycle to more than £5.14bn over three seasons.In other findings, the review said the size of the European football market reached nearly €25bn in the 2016/17 season, a 13% increase from 2014/15, with the aggregate revenues of clubs in the ‘big five’ European leagues topping €13bn, a 12% increase.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

10 01 20

first_imgSharesFC Koln fans and police. Photo/DMLONDON, United Kingdom, Sep 14 – Kick-off in the Europa League match between Arsenal and Cologne at the Emirates Stadium in London on Thursday has been delayed by an hour in the interests of “crowd safety”, the Premier League club announced.Thousands of ticketless fans of German club Cologne arrived at the Emirates, while travelling supporters who did have tickets were unable to gain access to the ground as police and stewards tried to ease the congestion in the surrounding streets. A match scheduled to start at 8:05pm local time (1905 GMT) is now set to get underway at 9:05pm (2005 GMT) instead.“The kick-off of #AFCvCOL has been delayed by an hour in the interests of crowd safety,” said a statement on Arsenal’s Twitter feed.Shares(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more