SECOND DEAD DOLPHIN WASHED UP ON DONEGAL BEACH


first_imgA small ‘common’ dolphin was washed up on Carrickfin beach yesterday.Carrickfin Beach.The dead dolphin was discovered by people walking on the beach and the stranding has been reported to the IWDG.This is the second stranding in the area in a few days – with a similar sized one washed up at Port Arthur beach on Sunday. It is not known how either dolphin died or if their deaths could be connected. SECOND DEAD DOLPHIN WASHED UP ON DONEGAL BEACH was last modified: January 13th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Carrickfin beachdolphinsdonegallast_img read more

Nature Does It Right


first_imgScientists and engineers continue to find well-designed features in living things that are worth imitating.Get a tail:  Extinct velociraptors, the terrors of the Jurassic Park movies, are inspiring robot designers.  Live Science and PhysOrg told about how Tailbot, developed at UC Berkeley and modeled after “leaping lizards,” can right itself after stumbling and can jump without tumbling.  “Engineers quickly understood the value of a tail,” said Thomas Libby, a grad student involved in the development of Tailbot.  “Robots are not nearly as agile as animals, so anything that can make a robot more stable is an advancement, which is why this work is so exciting.”  The PhysOrg article includes two entertaining video clips showing the robot clumsily attempting to duplicate the leaps a lizard does naturally (Tailbot’s attempt might be described as “falling with style”).  Prof. Robert J. Full remarked, “Inspiration from lizard tails will likely lead to far more agile search-and-rescue robots, as well as ones having greater capability to more rapidly detect chemical, biological or nuclear hazards.”Good design in bad water:  A briny pond at the lowest spot in the western hemisphere has a simple but descriptive name: Badwater.  Yet in this pond in Death Valley lives a microbe worth noting.  Science Daily says the “Death Valley Microbe May Spark Novel Biotech and Nanotech Uses.”  Why is that?  Dennis Bazylinski (U of Nevada) is impressed at the ability of the microbe to orient itself to magnetic fields.  The magnetic bacterium BW-1 has genes that produce nano-sized crystals of the minerals magnetite (a form of iron oxide) and greigite (a form of iron sulfide); BW-1 is the first microbe isolated capable of synthesizing greigite.  Bazylinski sees treasure in these microbes: their magnetosomes make them “useful in drug delivery and medical imaging.”  The article states that “Magnetotactic bacteria are simple, single-celled organisms that are found in almost all bodies of water.”  They can’t be that simple, though, to do what they do: “As their name suggests, they orient and navigate along magnetic fields like miniature swimming compass needles.”Insect cuticle for the environment:  “Researchers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University have developed a new material that replicates the exceptional strength, toughness, and versatility of one of nature’s more extraordinary substances—insect cuticle,” reported PhysOrg.  They call it “Shrilk.”  Look for it in these products of the future: disposable diapers that degrade quickly, an environmentally safe alternative to plastic, biodegradable trash bags and packaging, sutures for wounds, and a scaffold for tissue regeneration.  Look at the praise they give to this material insects make on the fly:Natural insect cuticle, such as that found in the rigid exoskeleton of a housefly or grasshopper, is uniquely suited to the challenge of providing protection without adding weight or bulk. As such, it can deflect external chemical and physical strains without damaging the insect’s internal components, while providing structure for the insect’s muscles and wings. It is so light that it doesn’t inhibit flight and so thin that it allows flexibility. Also remarkable is its ability to vary its properties, from rigid along the insect’s body segments and wings to elastic along its limb joints.The Wyss Institute is on a mission to “create bioinspired materials and products.”  They’re understandably proud of their Shrilk, thanks to their flying friends.A bird, a plane:  In the tradition of the Wright Brothers, another aeronautical engineer has taken inspiration from birds.  PhysOrg calls “Queensland University of Technology PhD student Wesam Al Sabban” a genius for his “unmanned aerial vehicle that uses wind power like a bird.”  Does that imply that birds are even more intelligent for coming up with the design first?  To develop his Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) called the Green Falcon II, Al Sabban had to learn from the masters. “As part of my PhD topic we are studying the way birds make use of wind energy to fly with minimum power, the way they glide and use all types of wind to move and change their flight path.”  He boasts, “The Green Falcon II will be a zero-emissions UAV capable of round-the-clock service.” Birds are kind of like that.  Unreported is whether the robot will leave spots on your car.Outdoing plants?  PhysOrg reported, “Researchers figure out how to outperform nature’s photosynthesis.”  The body of the article, though, reveals that they didn’t invent a light-gathering engine from scratch.  Rather, “They frankensteined together proteins from Synechococcus sp. with those from Clostridium acetobutylicum using molecular wire to create a ‘hybrid biological/organic nanoconstruct’ that was more efficient than either on their own.”  So, even though “These researchers have created a tiny solar-powered device that works twice as fast as nature to produce hydrogen biofuel,” it would be more impressive if they got their own dirt.Slimy computers:  Some Japanese researchers became fascinated with slime molds.  “A brainless, primeval organism able to navigate a maze might help Japanese scientists devise the ideal transport network design,” PhysOrg wrote.  “Not bad for a mono-cellular being that lives on rotting leaves.”  Somehow the cells of amoeboid yellow slime mold can find the most direct route through a maze to get to their food:  “the cells appear to have a kind of information-processing ability that allows them to ‘optimise’ the route along which the mold grows to reach food while avoiding stresses – like light – that may damage them.”  This means that we have something in common with slime.  “Humans are not the only living things with information-processing abilities,” said Toshiyuki Nakagaki.  Sloughing off his Ig Nobel Prizes for loving slime, he sees a bright future: “it could provide the key to designing bio-computers capable of solving complex problems.”Butterfly materials:  The blue mountain swallowtail butterfly is not just pretty; it’s downright inspiring.  “Butterflies have inspired humans since the time of ancient Egypt, but now they’re also inspiring researchers to look toward nature to help create the next generation of waterproof materials for electronics and sensors,” reported PhysOrg.  That’s why researchers in America and South Korea are looking carefully at the wings of this butterfly.  “The wings shed water easily because of tiny structures that trap air and create a cushion between water and wing which allows water to roll easily off the surface.”  Wouldn’t it be nice to have a cell phone that repels water, instead of shorting out when doused?  One team member said, “Mimicking biological surfaces in nature is an important part in a variety of practical applications.”Spider silkworm:  The desire to imitate spider silk was one of the first biomimetics stories reported in these pages.  In the years since, scientists have had only partial success at duplicating the strands, or at genetically engineering goats with the silk genes to produce it in their milk.  Now, researchers from Wyoming, Indiana and China have succeeded in transplanting the genes for spider dragline silk into silkworms.  Since ancient times, humans have farmed silkworms, so we know about their care and feeding; wrangling spiders is much more difficult.  Reporting in PNAS (Jan 3, 2012, 73/pnas.1109420109), they announced,The development of a spider silk-manufacturing process is of great interest. However, there are serious problems with natural manufacturing through spider farming, and standard recombinant protein production platforms have provided limited progress due to their inability to assemble spider silk proteins into fibers. Thus, we used piggyBac vectors to create transgenic silkworms encoding chimeric silkworm/spider silk proteins. The silk fibers produced by these animals were composite materials that included chimeric silkworm/spider silk proteins integrated in an extremely stable manner. Furthermore, these composite fibers were, on average, tougher than the parental silkworm silk fibers and as tough as native dragline spider silk fibers. These results demonstrate that silkworms can be engineered to manufacture composite silk fibers containing stably integrated spider silk protein sequences, which significantly improve the overall mechanical properties of the parental silkworm silk fibers.Of this achievement, the BBC News announced, “Spider-Man web closer to reality.”  Live Science’s article has a humorous photo of a future T-shirt labeled, “95% silkworm / 5% spider.”  Impressive as this work is, it’s not the same as coming up with the silk from scratch.  The team still had to use the real animals and their genetic information.None of these articles mentioned evolution.  It’s all design, inspiration, and motivation.  Bio-inspired researchers want to produce better products, safer for the environment, safer for humans, helping humanity without damaging the planet.  Home school parents should use stories like these to fascinate their precocious youngsters with the wonders all around them, right in their back yards.  It can lead to a new crop of highly-motivated scientists, 100% Darwin-free (which means, safer for the environment, safer for humans, helping humanity without damaging the planet).(Visited 21 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Junior Market Barrow Breed Sale of Champions


first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Champion Berkshire exhibited by Ava Genter of Archbold sold to Buckeye Barrow Boosters, D.A. Smith Auctioneer, Kremer Yorkshires, and Bodey Insurance for $3,400. The Champion Chester White exhibited by Lillian Rees of Bidwell sold to Buckeye Barrow Boosters, Dean’s Pawn, Foster Sales, Ohio Valley Pig Sale, Ryan Smith State Rep. for $4,300. The Champion Duroc exhibited by Coby Hughes of Sabina sold to Buckeye Barrow Boosters, Fayette County Pork Producers, and Huffman’s Market for $4,500. The Champion Hampshire exhibited by Mason Creager of Wauseon sold to Buckeye Barrow Boosters and United Producers for $1,400. Reserve champion exhibitors: Berkshire, Aaron Rolfe, Sabina; Chester White, Alexa Hawk, Harrod; Duroc, Gracee Beth Stewart, Sabina; Hampshire, Austin Hunker, Bellevue; Hereford, Jennifer Bittner, Hamilton; Landrace, Madelyn Harrison, Hamilton; Poland China, Ethan Wendt, Dublin; Spotted, Kaci Way, West Salem; Tamworth, Ashton Frey, Upper Sandusky; Yorkshire, Madison Petro, Gallipolis; Dark Crossbred, Mason Creager, Wauseon; Light Crossbred, Lea Kimley, South Charleston. The Champion Poland China exhibited by Treanna Lavy of Pleasant Hill sold to Buckeye Barrow Boosters, Miami Valley Feed and Grain, Sunrise Co-op and Tri-Ag products for $2,050. The Champion Landrace exhibited by Peyton Bumgardner of South Vienna sold to Buckeye Barrow Boosters, Sunrise Co-op, Lensman Showpigs, Woodruff Feed and Fence and United Producers for $1,700. The Champion Hereford exhibited by Cameron Shellhouse of Sycamore sold to Buckeye Barrow Boosters and United Producers for $1,300. The Champion Spot exhibited by Lindsey Dore of Galena sold to Buckeye Barrow Boosters and John Regula, Auctioneer for $1,700. The Champion Tamworth exhibited by Liam Shellhouse of Sycamore sold to Buckeye Barrow Boosters and United Producers for $1,150. The Champion Yorkshire exhibited by Levi Stauffer of Mt. Blanchard sold to Buckeye Barrow Boosters and Huffman’s Market for $3,500.The Buckeye Barrow Boosters also supported each exhibitor in the sale. They include: Ward Family Genetics, Jim Yeazel and Family, Ohio Hamp/York Crossbred Sale, Ohio State Fair Youth Gilt Sale, Korb Farms, Inc., Ohio Pork Schop, Kremer Yorkshires, Kimley Show Pigs, Ohio’s Country Journal/Ohio Ag Net, Moyer’s Genetic Edge, Rick Fogle, North Central Pig Sale, Isla Grande Farms, Bates Show Pigs, Mark Butterfield Family, Waits Family, Scott Evans Family, Michael Carson Family, Thompson Show Feed, Bryan Vaughan Family, 3N Livestock, Robert Keener Family, Roger Zeedyk Family, Wendt Livestock, and Nate Warner Livestock, Kaffenbarger Farms, Tony Nye Family, Ohio Spot Association, John Regula Auctioneer, Bob Foster Family, Fender Club Pigs, Fearon Family, Knecht Family, Dore Family, Kerby Wilcox Family, Jim Worley Family, Nathan Frey Family, Jason Adams Family, Scholl Family Ron Riley Family, Kevin Hancock Family, Chris Scott Family, Creager Family Farm, Kirk Swenson Family.last_img read more

Three drown, more than 20 missing after boat capsizes in Bihar


first_imgAt least three persons drowned while more than 20 others went missing after a boat carrying close to 80 people capsized in the Mahananda river in Katihar district, police said on Friday.Deputy Superintendent of Police, Barsoi, Pankaj Kumar said the incident took place on the Bihar-Bengal border at about 8.15 pm on Thursday night close to Jagannathpur Ghat when residents of Wajidpur village here were returning after shopping in Rampur Haat market of the adjoining state, situated right across the river.“Prima facie, it appears to be a case of overloading. The boat had a capacity of 40 passengers but was carrying almost double the number. So far three unidentified bodies of an elderly man, a woman and a child have been recovered”, the DSP said.“Many of those riding the boat either swam to safety or were rescued by onlookers. About two dozen people are yet to be traced … professional divers have been deployed for the purpose,” he added.last_img read more

ExED Director under CBI lens over CVC complaint


first_imgNew Delhi: The Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) is probing into a complaint of an alleged disproportionate case against former Enforcement Directorate Director Karnal Singh who retired last year, top official sources said. A highly placed CBI source told IANS: “A complaint against Singh has been received from the Central Vigilance Commission (CVC) of alleged disproportionate property case.” He said the agency the complaint was received about one and a half month ago. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’ When asked if the CBI has registered a case or initiated any preliminary enquiry (PE) against Singh, he replied: “As of now, we have not filed any case, nor initiated any PE. “At first, we are verifying the allegations against Singh. On the basis of verification of the complaint, a decision will be taken — to register a case or file a PE — whichever is necessary.” When pressed further about the contents of the complaint, he refused to share any further details. Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&K Singh, a 1984-batch IPS officer of Union Territories cadre, took over as the ED Director on October 27, 2016 and retired last October. Under Singh, the agency attached moveable and immoveable properties worth Rs 36,000 crore. Before him, the ED in last the 10 years had attached assets worth only Rs 9,000 crore. He had been credited with leading some high-profile investigation cases such as the VVIP helicopters case, cases against former Finance Minister P. Chidambaram and his son Karti, Sterling Biotech case and the Nirav Modi and Vijay Mallya money laundering investigations. Under his leadership, the ED strength increased from 682 staffers to 1,033 in the past three years. He has also been credited in bringing about newer policies for vigilance checks for induction of officials into the ED even as the much awaited ‘special investigation incentive’ was granted to the agency sleuths on the lines of what is given to CBI investigators. Six dedicated forensic labs across the country and field forensic kits to quickly clone hardware during raids were also introduced in his tenure. Before his appointment as the ED director, Singh served in Delhi Police’s elite Special Cell. He was instrumental in the computerisation of crime and criminal records and personal information system in the Delhi Police besides cracking several bomb blast cases in the national capital in 2008.last_img read more