Reflections on a catastrophe


first_imgAs twilight fell over Port-au-Prince that first terrible night after Haiti’s January earthquake, Louise Ivers watched a strange cloud of dust settle over the city. Stirred by buildings collapsing as the late afternoon quake struck, the cloud was pierced only by sound, a rising chorus of screams from across the capital as the toll became apparent.Ivers, a Harvard Medical School assistant professor, infectious disease specialist at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Haiti clinical director for the nonprofit group Partners In Health, was bruised and battered herself. She had been in a conference room, discussing enhanced food aid for HIV/AIDS patients, when the quake struck.Ironically, the discussion had just digressed to disaster food distribution, with Ivers making the point that after 2008’s devastating hurricanes, officials had to be prepared for the certainty that natural disasters would strike again.When the shaking began, it knocked Ivers to the floor as if she had been slapped. Everyone in the room was tossed down and repeatedly shaken as they stumbled to the doorway and out to the street. There, confused, they were greeted with devastation.“Every single building to the right of that building, every single building behind that building collapsed. The wall to the compound collapsed onto the road and killed two people,” Ivers said. “I never thought about earthquakes in Haiti. I didn’t know what was happening. I thought a bomb went off.”The first minutes passed as if in slow motion. Ivers found herself in a nearby courtyard, when a member of the group there said, “I wish someone was a doctor.”That snapped Ivers out of her trance.“I’m a doctor,” she responded. And her world shifted from slow motion to hyperspeed.The night that followed was utter chaos. Ivers was the only person in the area with medical training, but she was without supplies and had no way to get the injured to the city’s medical infrastructure, which she later would learn had been destroyed.Her recounting of the night — given in mid-February in Port-au-Prince, where she continues to coordinate earthquake relief — poured out in her Irish-accented speech, as if she were viewing a slowly accelerating moving picture in her head as she talked. Reaching over a fence, a man handed her a baby, one arm shredded to the tendons, urging her to take him to get care. She handed the baby back and told the father to come with her. They would get help together.She told of passing a “pile” of screaming children, panicked and covered in white dust from the collapsed buildings. During the long, dark hours that followed, she helped however she could: using first-aid kits and yanking license plates off cars to employ as makeshift splints.“It was just nonstop. There were no other doctors there, nobody in charge, just first-aid kits from cars,” she said.She tried to treat those she came across. But with no supplies, no trained help, and an overwhelming number of injured, some bled to death as she struggled to save them. The next morning, trucks arrived from the United Nations, and Ivers helped to put four bodies in them. Then a man came up, holding a baby, and asked Ivers to examine him. One look told her the baby was already dead. She looked at the father for a moment, trying to tell whether he understood the situation.When Ivers broke the news to him, he asked what he should do. He had walked a long way, he said, and wanted to know whether he should walk back with the body. Ivers said that if he wanted, he could put the baby in the truck with the other bodies.“We helped him put his baby in the back of the truck with the other four people we put in there,” Ivers said. “It was really, really horrific.”Ivers made her way to a tent hospital that had sprung up on the United Nations compound and, as the only doctor there, found herself in charge. Amid the flood of injured people, she moved constantly during the hours that followed. The first relief to arrive was truckloads of medicine and supplies from Partners In Health facilities in Haiti’s Central Plateau. Next came two doctors from the University of Miami, who pitched in alongside her. Finally, nearing collapse two days after the quake, Ivers rested, falling asleep in the back of the hospital.When she awoke, other physicians had arrived and were beginning to assume some of the burden, among them three Harvard Medical School faculty members, Brigham and Women’s Hospital physicians, and experienced Partners In Health hands: Assistant professors of medicine Jennifer Furin and Joia Mukherjee and instructor in medicine David Walton.The task that lay ahead promised many more long days and threatened to overwhelm even those newly arrived, but, for Ivers, help had come.last_img read more

Are you harnessing your brand power?


first_imgThere is no shortage of “good brands” out there. But when a brand graduates from good to great, that’s where the magic happens. A brand is the promise of an experience. Whether it’s the hope that comes with new opportunities or knowledge, or the sense of pride that an action instills, emotions tied to particular experiences guide human decision making and memory. In the end, it is the emotional resonance of those experiences that makes a brand memorable and elevates it from good to great. In working with financial brands across the country for many years, I’ve experienced firsthand what brands have done to hit home runs for their audience. Brands that successfully curate memorable experiences have two things in common: they understand and embrace their “why,” and they lean hard into data. This results in a deep understanding of who they are and who matters to them, which allows them to champion a consistent, effective brand identity across all channels.So how do you up the ante from good to memorable? Start by asking these three questions about your credit union.1. Does your brand experience align with your “why”?Over 10 years ago, author and leadership expert Simon Sinek grabbed the attention of business leaders around the world with the notion of starting with why. He posited that consumers don’t buy what you do, they buy why you do it. This idea challenged the belief that consumers are all rational creatures who buy solely based on price, rates or features. Instead, Sinek asserted, consumers make purchasing decisions in alignment with their value systems AND based on emotion. Simply put, the experience that your brand offers should match your market’s end goal; for credit unions, you should constantly be asking what are my members – both current and prospective – looking for and what do they need or want to feel. All of these elements make up your target audience’s “why.” Bypassing the why is one of the most common missteps I’ve seen clients make. Too often, brands focus on the products or services they bring to the table, rather than the innate reasons a person would want them in the first place. Members are real people with complex stories of their own that resonate with the same human truths that drive each of us to action. Think of it this way: people don’t want a loan for the sake of a loan. And they don’t even necessarily want a loan because they want a house. What people want is the life achievement that buying a home represents; that feeling of security, of being able to provide for their loved ones, accomplishment, validation and pride.Once you understand the why, you can make intentional connections throughout the member journey that reinforce the understanding of what you stand for and what promises your brand is making to the member if they engage with you. These connections can be scaled greatly, ranging from highly produced, experiential interactions at every touchpoint, to the well-timed share of a member testimonial that inspires someone to see themselves in your brand and your mission. 2. Does the market connect with your brand in the way you intend?Understanding the why doesn’t carry much weight if you misinterpret the how. How does your target audience see you? How do you want to be seen? How much space exists between these truths? That gap is typically what inhibits the positive growth brands strive for. Our brains are inundated with information. As a result, if we can’t make a personal connection, our brain moves on to process the next piece of information vying for our attention. I saw this play out recently while working with a credit union who sought help in battling stagnant membership growth. They were firmly established and positioned themselves as a luxury brand that took pride in their high-level, personalized service. Following suit, their ads painted the picture of an upscale lifestyle: big houses, expensive clothing and extravagant cars. When we dug into the data and individual testimonies beneath the assumptions, a large difference in perception versus reality was revealed. Ultimately, prospective members could not see themselves reflected in the brand. Instead of feeling empowered and catered to by what the brand was projecting, members of the credit union’s target audience felt inadequate and like they didn’t belong. Leadership was shocked by these findings, as their strong existing member relationships afforded them a misplaced sense of comfort.  How do you avoid this common pitfall? First, take stock of your current market perception. Test your assumptions regularly to ground your action in a data-based strategy. Make it an annual priority to take a pulse check of your brand and target market, and any changes in the gap between them. Understand your competitive environment. This includes not only your current members, but also those who went elsewhere. Staying in touch with and analyzing changes in consumer trends helps you proactively identify areas of disconnect and make appropriate changes to your brand experience. This is crucial to creating a brand that continues to resonate with prospective members over time. 3. Are you expressing your brand consistently?Seemingly simple, this one carries a lot of weight. With multiple touchpoints, members can experience your brand across many channels. While adaptations may be necessary for specific platforms or to accommodate unprecedented circumstances (a global pandemic, perhaps?), your brand should be communicating and reinforcing the same story everywhere. Why is this so important? Consistency is key to brand recognition and trust. It’s important to remember that not every consumer will interact with your brand everywhere, so making sure your brand maintains consistency across all channels is key to a strong and resonant brand experience.We often see clients create beautiful websites and other digital collateral, but the experience feels very different in other channels, creating a disconnect for users. With that gap comes the increased opportunity for customers to look elsewhere to a solution that makes more sense to them. While websites are perceived to offer more flexibility, if done well, the experience delivered in a branch or through other channels can be flexible and convey the same feeling of connection and belonging.What makes brands competitive today isn’t the product or service they sell, but the experience they offer. Consumers want an experience that is comfortable, user-friendly and dynamic; one that resonates with them on a personal level. From your physical branch to your digital channels, every interaction is an opportunity to build a relationship with your members. If you view every aspect of your brand through this experiential lens and ground your message in emotional, contextually relevant human truths, that is what will take you from good to memorable. 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Rachel Scott Rachel Scott is Brand Lead at La Macchia Group, where her more than five years of experience crafting brand identities for financial institutions has included several award-winning rebrands. Contact Rachel … Web: www.lamacchiagroup.com Detailslast_img read more

Walker Buehler leaves early with rib soreness, but Dodgers power their way past Braves, over .500


first_imgPreviousLos Angeles Dodgers’ Joc Pederson, from left, Enrique Hernandez and Matt Kemp celebrate the team’s 7-3 win against the Atlanta Braves in a baseball game, Friday, June 8, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 08: Heat athletic trainer Neil Rampe walks off the field with starting pitcher Walker Buehler #21 of the Los Angeles Dodgers as he leaves because of an injury in the fifth inning of the game against the Atlanta Braves at Dodger Stadium on June 8, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 08: Walker Buehler #21 of the Los Angeles Dodgers pitches in the first inning of the game against the Atlanta Braves at Dodger Stadium on June 8, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsLos Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Walker Buehler throws against the Atlanta Braves during the first inning of a baseball game, Friday, June 8, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Atlanta Braves starting pitcher Brandon McCarthy throws against the Los Angeles Dodgers during the first inning of a baseball game, Friday, June 8, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Yasiel Puig connects with an RBI single during the first inning of a baseball game against the Atlanta Braves, Friday, June 8, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 08: Yasiel Puig #66 of the Los Angeles Dodgers hits a RBI single in the first inning of the game against the Atlanta Braves at Dodger Stadium on June 8, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 08: Yasmani Grandal #9 of the Los Angeles Dodgers hits a solo home run in the second inning of the game against the Atlanta Braves at Dodger Stadium on June 8, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)Atlanta Braves starting pitcher Brandon McCarthy stands near the mound as Los Angeles Dodgers’ Yasmani Grandal, background left, rounds the bases after hitting a home run during the second inning of a baseball game, Friday, June 8, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Walker Buehler throws against the Atlanta Braves during the first inning of a baseball game, Friday, June 8, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Matt Kemp stands in the batter’s box during the first inning of a baseball game against the Atlanta Braves, Friday, June 8, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Matt Kemp, right, is greeted by Yasmani Grandal after scoring on a single hit by Yasiel Puig during the first inning of a baseball game against the Atlanta Braves, Friday, June 8, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Walker Buehler throws against the Atlanta Braves during the first inning of a baseball game, Friday, June 8, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Yasmani Grandal celebrates his home run during the second inning of a baseball game against the Atlanta Braves, Friday, June 8, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Walker Buehler throws against the Atlanta Braves during the first inning of a baseball game, Friday, June 8, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Atlanta Braves’ Freddie Freeman takes off his helmet after striking out in the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers, Friday, June 8, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Yasmani Grandal rounds the bases after hitting a home run, his second home run of the game, during the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Atlanta Braves, Friday, June 8, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)The Dodgers’ Yasmani Grandal celebrates as he trots toward home plate after hitting his second home run of the game during the fourth inning Friday night at Dodger Stadium. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Atlanta Braves’ Nick Markakis scores on a double hit by Kurt Suzuki during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers, Friday, June 8, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Joc Pederson celebrates his home run during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Atlanta Braves, Friday, June 8, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Atlanta Braves starting pitcher Brandon McCarthy, right, hands the ball to manager Brian Snitker during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers, Friday, June 8, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Joc Pederson, right, celebrates his home run with third base coach Chris Woodward during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Atlanta Braves, Friday, June 8, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Atlanta Braves starting pitcher Brandon McCarthy, center, leaves the mound after he was relieved by manager Brian Snitker during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers, Friday, June 8, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Atlanta Braves’ Ryan Flaherty flips his bat after swinging at a pitch during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers, Friday, June 8, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Max Muncy, left, celebrates his home run with Matt Kemp during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Atlanta Braves, Friday, June 8, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Atlanta Braves’ Freddie Freeman hits an RBI double during the sixth inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers, Friday, June 8, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Dodgers relief pitcher Pat Venditte throws against the Atlanta Braves during the sixth inning of a baseball game, Friday, June 8, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Dodgers relief pitcher Pat Venditte throws against the Atlanta Braves during the sixth inning of a baseball game, Friday, June 8, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 08: Brandon McCarthy #32 of the Atlanta Braves pitches in the first inning of the game against the Los Angeles Dodgers at Dodger Stadium on June 8, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 08: Matt Kemp #27 of the Los Angeles Dodgers is greeted in the dugout after scoring a run on a RBI single by Yasiel Puig #66 of the Los Angeles Dodgers in the first inning of the game against the Atlanta Braves at Dodger Stadium on June 8, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 08: Matt Kemp #27 of the Los Angeles Dodgers rounds third on his way to score a run on a RBI single by Yasiel Puig #66 of the Los Angeles Dodgers in the first inning of the game against the Atlanta Braves at Dodger Stadium on June 8, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 08: Kurt Suzuki #24 doubles in Nick Markakis #22 of the Atlanta Braves as he beats the throw from Joc Pederson #31 to Yasmani Grandal #9 of the Los Angeles Dodgers as he scores a run on a double by Kurt Suzuki #24 of the Atlanta Braves in the fifth inning of the game at Dodger Stadium on June 8, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 08: Kurt Suzuki #24 doubles in Nick Markakis #22 of the Atlanta Braves as he beats the throw from Joc Pederson #31 to Yasmani Grandal #9 of the Los Angeles Dodgers as he scores a run on a double by Kurt Suzuki #24 of the Atlanta Braves in the fifth inning of the game at Dodger Stadium on June 8, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 08: Max Muncy #13 gets a high five from Matt Kemp #27 of the Los Angeles Dodgers after hitting a solo home run in the fifth fifth inning of the game at Dodger Stadium on June 8, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 08: Max Muncy #13 of the Los Angeles Dodgers hits a solo home run in the fifth fifth inning of the game against the Atlanta Braves at Dodger Stadium on June 8, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 08: Joc Pederson #31 of the Los Angeles Dodgers crosses the plate after hitting a solo home run in the fifth fifth inning of the game against the Atlanta Braves at Dodger Stadium on June 8, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 08: Yasmani Grandal #9 is greeted in the dugout by Joc Pederson #31 of the Los Angeles Dodgers after hitting his second solo home run of the game in the fifth inning against the Atlanta Braves at Dodger Stadium on June 8, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 08: Kurt Suzuki #24 of the Atlanta Braves hits a RBI double over a leaping Matt Kemp #27 of the Los Angeles Dodgers in the fifth fifth inning of the game at Dodger Stadium on June 8, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 08: Joc Pederson #31 of the Los Angeles Dodgers is congratulated by Matt Kemp #27 of the Los Angeles Dodgers after a solo home run in the fifth inning of the game against the Atlanta Braves at Dodger Stadium on June 8, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 08: Starting pitcher Walker Buehler #21 of the Los Angeles Dodgers returns to the dugout as he leaves the game due to an injury in the fifth inning against the Atlanta Braves at Dodger Stadium on June 8, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 08: Cody Bellinger #35 of the Los Angeles Dodgers is congratulated in the dugout after a solo home run in the eighth inning of the game against the Atlanta Braves at Dodger Stadium on June 8, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Enrique Hernandez can’t catch a home run hit by Atlanta Braves’ Johan Camargo during the eighth inning of a baseball game, Friday, June 8, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Joc Pederson, from left, Enrique Hernandez and Matt Kemp celebrate the team’s 7-3 win against the Atlanta Braves in a baseball game, Friday, June 8, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 08: Heat athletic trainer Neil Rampe walks off the field with starting pitcher Walker Buehler #21 of the Los Angeles Dodgers as he leaves because of an injury in the fifth inning of the game against the Atlanta Braves at Dodger Stadium on June 8, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)NextShow Caption1 of 42LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 08: Heat athletic trainer Neil Rampe walks off the field with starting pitcher Walker Buehler #21 of the Los Angeles Dodgers as he leaves because of an injury in the fifth inning of the game against the Atlanta Braves at Dodger Stadium on June 8, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)ExpandLOS ANGELES — As the Dodgers have inched toward the top of the National League West standings for the past month, the arrival of Walker Buehler has made a sizable impact.The rookie pitcher and top prospect has added a valuable arm to a starting rotation overrun with injuries.In a 7-3 victory over the Atlanta Braves on Friday night, Buehler was about as effective as he’s been since his late April call-up.The right-hander carried a perfect game into the fifth, setting down the first 12 batters he faced, a stretch that ended when Nick Markakis singled into center field to lead off the inning. Markakis scored on the next at-bat when Kurt Suzuki doubled, the lone run Buehler allowed. Dave Roberts talks about the severity of @buehlersdayoff’s rib soreness, @YazmanianDVL08’s night at the plate and more. pic.twitter.com/avhXSlGVJJ— SportsNet LA (@SportsNetLA) June 9, 2018 “To his credit, he’s as tough as they come and wanting to stay in there,” Roberts said. “But obviously it was a no-brainer for us.”Buehler was scheduled to undergo imaging scans and further tests late Friday with a timetable for his return uncertain. Buehler, who left before speaking with reporters, has undergone unspecified treatment in recent weeks.If Buehler misses subsequent starts, it would be another setback for the Dodgers’ injury-riddled rotation. Four of the five pitchers in their Opening Day rotation have already hit the disabled list this season.“If you’re a pitcher on this staff, heads up,” Roberts quipped.Other Dodgers marveled at the latest development.“When we saw Doc and the trainer come out, we’re like, ‘Man, this is crazy,’ I’ve never seen anything like it,” first baseman Cody Bellinger said. “But our organization is so good at depth and this is the reason why.”With the win, the Dodgers (32-31) saw their record climb above .500 for the first time since April. They have won 16 of their last 21 games and moved into a three-way tie with the Rockies and San Francisco Giants for second place in the NL West, 1-1/2 games behind the division-leading Arizona Diamondbacks (33-29).The Dodgers gave Buehler enough early insurance with plenty of power against Atlanta (36-27).Catcher Yasmani Grandal drove a pair of solo home runs into center field in the second and fourth innings, landing in nearly identical spots and energizing much of the crowd of 47,262 at Dodger Stadium. His second blast gave the Dodgers a 3-0 lead.Only eight previous times had Grandal homered in the same game.Joc Pederson and Max Muncy, who batted atop the lineup Friday, followed with a pair of two-out solo home runs in the fifth inning. For Pederson, it was his sixth home run in as many games.The Dodgers finished with a season-high five solo home runs, capped by a 410-foot blast by Bellinger into the right-field bleachers – his fourth in four games. They have hit 22 home runs in their past seven games.“We’re finally playing with confidence,” Bellinger said.Much of the damage came against former Dodger Brandon McCarthy, the veteran right-hander who was traded in the offseason as part of a salary dump.In his return to Dodger Stadium, McCarthy allowed four earned runs on five hits in 4-2/3 innings, striking out four and walking one. He was removed from the game after surrendering the solo homer to Pederson.Roberts mused on whether his players’ familiarity with McCarthy helped, especially Grandal.“No one knows him better than his catcher,” Roberts said.Roberts said right fielder Yasiel Puig, who left the game in the sixth inning, exited due to an “in-house thing,” but would return to the lineup Saturday. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error It was an effort that rivaled perhaps his best start in a 4-0 victory over the San Diego Padres in Mexico City last month, when Buehler pitched six innings of a combined no-hitter.But Buehler left in the sixth inning Friday after a mound visit from Manager Dave Roberts and a team trainer, and he appeared to be the latest to face an injury setback. When his last two fastballs dipped in velocity to 95 mph, it was of concern to Roberts. According to Brooks Baseball, Buehler’s velocity has sat at an average of 97 mph this season.“It just seemed like he wasn’t letting it go like he was earlier,” Roberts said. “For me, that was a big red flag, that he was protecting.”Roberts said Buehler experienced soreness in his ribs, side effects from when he was hit there by a line drive during a start against the Colorado Rockies on May 21. Buehler was in pain Friday and had trouble breathing, Roberts said, despite the strong outing.Over 5-1/3 innings against the Braves, Buehler allowed two hits and one run, while striking out four and walking none on a season-low 71 pitches.last_img read more