USS New Mexico Visits Namesake State


first_img Training & Education USS New Mexico Visits Namesake State Share this article Back to overview,Home naval-today USS New Mexico Visits Namesake State View post tag: Navy USS New Mexico (SSN 779) commanding officer and chief of the boat visited the Virginia-class attack submarine’s namesake state, Jan. 29-31, in honor of the ship’s commissioning nearly three years ago.Cmdr. George Perez, commanding officer, USS New Mexico and his chief of the boat, Master Chief Electronics Technician (SS) Steven Fritzler met New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez (R-NM), members of the USS New Mexico Committee and the New Mexico Navy League members.“As USS New Mexico prepares to depart on her maiden deployment, it is important for us to personally convey to our namesake state and the New Mexico Committee just how much the crew appreciates their support,” said Perez.Dick Brown, chairman, USS New Mexico Committee coordinated the visit as a way to continue forging the strong bonds between the state and their namesake submarine.“Scheduling a meeting between our governor while the State Legislature is in session and the commanding officer of a submarine is quite a challenge,” said Brown. “But it’s all part of our committee’s work in helping to maintain strong ties between the submarine and its namesake state.”Brown and his committee vice chairman, retired Lt. Cmdr. Damon Runyan, have been spearheading other collaboration opportunities with the boat and the state to include a letter-writing initiative between an Albuquerque-based elementary school. Forty-five students attending the North Star Elementary School sent letters to the crew of the Virginia-class submarine in 2012, to which Sailors have since responded.“We just received 45 letters back from individual crew members addressed to the kids,” said Brown. “What a wonderful opportunity for a pen-pal exchange.”New Mexico was commissioned March 27, 2010 and was the sixth Virginia-class submarine to be commissioned. There are currently 127 officers and enlisted Sailors assigned to New Mexico.New Mexico was commissioned March 27, 2010 and was the sixth Virginia-class submarine to be commissioned. There are currently 127 officers and enlisted Sailors assigned to New Mexico.[mappress]Naval Today Staff, February 1, 2013; Image: US Navy View post tag: Defense View post tag: State View post tag: Namesake View post tag: Naval View post tag: USS View post tag: New View post tag: Mexico View post tag: Defence View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Visit February 1, 2013last_img read more

MMH to open services lines starting immediately


first_imgBatesville, IN—After careful review of the current volume of COVID-19 patients and analysis of the supply of personal protective equipment (PPE), Margaret Mary Health feels it is safe for patients and staff to begin reopening several of the temporarily suspended services. Effective immediately, Margaret Mary Health will resume joint injections at the Outpatient Clinic, screening colonoscopies, screening mammograms, and bone density scans. Beginning Monday, April 27, outpatient elective surgeries will resume. The hospital plans to assess the status weekly to determine future service re-entry dates, including inpatient surgeries.“The temporary suspension of many of our procedures, including the screening colonoscopies and mammograms, was necessary as we prepared for a surge in potential COVID-19 patients, but was also concerning for the potential negative impact it can have on the overall health of our community.  Early detection equals better prognosis which is why these preventative screenings are so very important. When patients ignore symptoms, this results in a later diagnosis and often a worse outcome. I can’t emphasize enough the importance of coming in for scheduled screenings and appointments now that we’re able to resume these,” noted Surgeon Jon Geers, MD at Margaret Mary Health.President and CEO of Margaret Mary Health, Tim Putnam added, “I want to thank our community for following the stay-at-home order and social distancing guidelines. Your efforts have helped to flatten the curve to the point where we feel it is safe to begin reopening the services that many in our community need, and unfortunately have had to postpone since early March. We had a challenging period from the end of March through early April with an influx of high-acuity COVID-19 patients. During that time, we acquired necessary equipment, PPE and supplies, and developed a robust surge plan. Should another wave of this virus enter our community, we feel confident we are prepared to handle it. We will monitor patient volumes closely and continue to phase back in services as long as we continue to see a decreasing number of COVID-19 patients in our service area. If that shifts and begins to rise again, we will adjust accordingly.”last_img read more

Center fosters support for the disabled


first_imgFor a short time in September, Sarah Hinojosa was the center of several Viterbi students’ attention.Sarah Hinojosa, a senior at Blair International Baccalaureate Magnet School in Pasadena, has Down’s syndrome. This year, she was a subject of a disability-themed “capstone project” — a mandatory senior design project that engineering students at USC have to complete before graduation.Inspired · For their capstone project, USC students followed the daily routine of Sarah Hinojosa, a high school senior with Down’s syndrome. – Photo courtesy of Olivia HinojosaThe students were using the project to understand the daily difficulties for people living with disabilities, and will make recommendations to improve their lives.Encouraging disability-oriented research, such as the study of Sarah Hinojosa’s everyday activities, is one of many initiatives currently being undertaken by the University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities to incorporate disability awareness into university-wide instruction.“We try to infuse disability content into courses at USC,” said Barbara Wheeler, associate director of the USC UCEDD. “We do lectures and social work; we co-taught a course on disability for social workers.”The USC UCEDD has two major aims: to provide non-medical treatment and therapy to developmentally disabled community members, which primarily takes place at Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, and to seek out the next generation of disability-related professionals and caretakers.“It’s very important that [college] students … focus on disability,” said Sarah’s mother, Olivia Hinojosa, of her willingness to see her daughter participate in the study.The students followed Sarah Hinojosa for a day, watching her carry out daily activities. At one point, while walking back from the grocery store, Sarah Hinojosa, who is in choir and loves to sing, began to practice for an upcoming performance.Her one-on-one aide, who assists her on a daily basis, had uploaded the lyrics to a song — Michael Jackson’s “Heal the World” — to Sarah Hinojosa’s mobile phone. The USC students were worried that Sarah Hinojosa might have difficulty operating the T-Mobile sidekick, but Sarah appeared to use the phone with ease.“They were able to clarify with Sarah and her one-on-one that she was able to navigate this size of equipment,” Olivia Hinojosa said.She said typically people with developmental disabilities are unable to use small equipment.The center is hoping projects like the Viterbi students’ and other efforts from universities across the nation can help increase knowledge of disabled populations and also inspire possible innovation in the future.“The idea was that if these children were going to be moving into the community — that was the long-term goal — that they would need to have a cadre of professionals who were skilled at working with these children and their families,” said Dr. Marion Taylor Baer, director of the Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities program within the USC UCEDD. “And since they have complex disorders, this needed to be an interdisciplinary team.”Baer’s LEND program readies graduate and post-graduate level students from varied academic backgrounds for positions of leadership in disability-related professions.“Our main purpose is to promote systemic change in our state to help people with developmental disabilities,” Wheeler said.In its efforts to increase the interaction between researchers and people with special needs, the Center is hoping it will be able to spur enough innovation to help improve the everyday lives of people like Sarah Hinojosa.Olivia Hinojosa said its important for students to interact on a personal level with people like her daughter. Only then, she said, can they see what types of technology developmentally disabled people have the most and least trouble operating.“It was just one of those little, opportune moments,” Olivia Hinojosa said. “Who would’ve thought they were going to stop and practice to sing, and that they would see her navigate on this small phone?”last_img read more

Chief Justice Commits to First-world Standards in Three Years


first_imgStory Highlights Outlining achievements of his first six months on the job, the Chief Justice said that in June and July this year, “we had a five-day leadership training course for all senior parish court judges, and a four-day leadership training programme for court administrators, registrars and deputy registrars of the Supreme Court; senior officers within court management services; as well as for supervisors in the Supreme Court, Court of Appeal and Coroners’ Court”. Delivering the main address at the Judiciary of Jamaica’s National Public Education Symposium and Expo, held on the grounds of the Clarendon Parish Court, in May Pen, Clarendon, on September 27, the Chief Justice said he is committed to First-World standards in the delivery of legal services.  Justice Sykes said he is now building the human capital in order to deliver the services needed and deserved by all Jamaicans. He added that no matter how many computers are available or how modern the buildings are, without the adequate personnel to do the job, it makes no sense. Chief Justice, Bryan Sykes, has given his commitment to raise the standards in the justice system to First World in three years.Delivering the main address at the Judiciary of Jamaica’s National Public Education Symposium and Expo, held on the grounds of the Clarendon Parish Court, in May Pen, Clarendon, on September 27, the Chief Justice said he is committed to First-World standards in the delivery of legal services.“I do not use the term administration, but delivery, because what matters is not what is planned or administered, but what is delivered. So I am making the commitment to Jamaica to be the best in the Caribbean in three years, and one of the best in the world in six years. In terms of service delivery, that is achievable,” Justice Sykes emphasised.He pointed out that the theme for his tenure as Chief Justice is: ‘One in Three in the Caribbean and One in Six in the World’, adding that although it is a dream and an idea, everything begins with an idea that has to be translated into action.Outlining achievements of his first six months on the job, the Chief Justice said that in June and July this year, “we had a five-day leadership training course for all senior parish court judges, and a four-day leadership training programme for court administrators, registrars and deputy registrars of the Supreme Court; senior officers within court management services; as well as for supervisors in the Supreme Court, Court of Appeal and Coroners’ Court”.He also noted that in August, the first visioning and strategic planning seminar was held. This involved the judiciary, Cabinet office and Ministry of Justice.“Out of this exercise, a strategic plan is being developed, and upon completion, will be shared with the nation no later than February 2019,” the Chief Justice said.Justice Sykes said he is now building the human capital in order to deliver the services needed and deserved by all Jamaicans. He added that no matter how many computers are available or how modern the buildings are, without the adequate personnel to do the job, it makes no sense.He encouraged students from five high schools present to participate as citizens who will be eligible to vote in a few years and take their place as adults in the society.“You have the opportunity to see what we do and make up your minds as to whether you want to be court administrators, lawyers, or serve in the courts. You are also citizens, and one of your roles is to assist in making Jamaica a peaceful and law-abiding country,” the Chief Justice said.Meanwhile, Justice Minister, Hon. Delroy Chuck, who brought greetings,   congratulated the Chief Justice and the Court Management Services for hosting the seminar.“The Ministry of Justice is committed to ensuring that the infrastructure and the facilities in the courts are of the highest standard,” the minister said.He pointed out that work is in progress at the Court of Appeal, and when it is completed next month, “it will definitely be five-star, and we are hoping that all the court facilities will be improved across the island. That is a commitment from us”.Among the entities offering services to attendees at the expo were Restorative Justice Unit, Justice Training Institute, National Taskforce Against Trafficking in Persons, Child Protection and Family Services Agency, Victim Services Division, Office of the Public Defender, Ministry of Justice, Dispute Resolution Foundation, National Integrity Action, Mobile Justice Unit, The Legal Aid Council and the Administrator General’s Department.last_img read more