Dell purchases US cloud computing firm Boomi


first_img DELL will buy US cloud-computing services company Boomi to shore up its ability to provide software over computer networks.The world’s second-largest PC maker did not disclose terms of the deal for Boomi, which counts Salesforce.com among its clients and helps integrate so-called cloud-based applications and smooth data transfers between programs.Boomi raised $4m (£2.5m) in 2008 in an initial round of institutional funding led by venture capital firm FirstMark Capital. The company is based in Berwyn, Pennsylvania, and was founded in 2000.Privately held Boomi was mentioned as a potential acquisition target after Dell rival IBM bought Cast Iron Systems earlier this year.Dell has been on the acquisition trail, but lost out recently in a bidding battle with larger rival Hewlett-Packard for high-end storage maker 3PAR. Chief executive officer Michael Dell had said at an industry event in Hong Kong that the company would announce a cloud-computing acquisition on Tuesday, spurring a round of market speculation on potential targets. Tuesday 2 November 2010 8:38 pm whatsapp Tags: NULL KCS-content Share Show Comments ▼ Dell purchases US cloud computing firm Boomi whatsapp More From Our Partners Mark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.com‘The Love Boat’ captain Gavin MacLeod dies at 90nypost.comSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comFeds seized 18 devices from Rudy Giuliani and his employees in April raidnypost.comKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comlast_img read more

Government savings boost outsourcers


first_img Tags: NULL by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailTotal PastThe Ingenious Reason There Are No Mosquitoes At Disney WorldTotal PastSerendipity TimesInside Coco Chanel’s Eerily Abandoned Mansion Frozen In TimeSerendipity TimesBrake For ItThe Most Worthless Cars Ever MadeBrake For ItBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBeLuxury SUVs | Search AdsThese Cars Are So Loaded It’s Hard to Believe They’re So CheapLuxury SUVs | Search Adsautooverload.comDeclassified Vietnam War Photos The Public Wasn’t Meant To Seeautooverload.comElite HeraldExperts Discover Girl Born From Two Different SpeciesElite HeraldDrivepedia20 Of The Most Underrated Vintage CarsDrivepedia KCS-content whatsapp Monday 31 January 2011 7:52 pm whatsapp CONSTRUCTION and facilities management firm Mitie said it was well placed for profitable growth as the cash-strapped UK government looked to outsourcers to help it cut costs. Mitie, which provides cleaning, security and maintenance services for banks and law courts, said it expected earnings for the year ending 31 March to be in line with its estimates.“Budgetary pressure in the public sector is beginning to create substantial opportunities for outsourcing and this is evident in both the increasing use of framework agreements and in our growing sales pipeline,” the company said in a statement.The FTSE All Share Support Services Index has gained 12 per cent since the coalition came to power in May last year.Mitie shares, which have risen 14 per cent since the company in November posted a 12 per cent growth in first-half pretax profit, closed five per cent lower at 218.3p yesterday. Meanwhile, support services firm Carillion said it had signed a memorandum of understanding with the British government, which is trying to get its suppliers to cut costs and pass on the savings. It said it was changing “the scale and scope of outsourced services across a number of… existing contracts” that are worth about £200m, but that it was not changing market guidance. Analysts at RBS said the announcement was negative but not entirely unexpected. The firm also announced £350m of contract wins, including a £45 deal to build accommodation for the armed forces at Whittington Barracks. center_img Share Government savings boost outsourcers Show Comments ▼ More From Our Partners Supermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgKamala Harris keeps list of reporters who don’t ‘understand’ her: reportnypost.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comFeds seized 18 devices from Rudy Giuliani and his employees in April raidnypost.comMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.comlast_img read more

Inflation means bigger Budget cuts


first_imgMonday 21 March 2011 9:36 pm Share whatsapp IT’S Budget time again. Tomorrow is George Osborne’s big day; he will be tasked with reinvigorating the coalition’s flagging support without giving up on austerity. There will be plenty of new policies, most of which have been heavily discussed already. But here are a few thoughts that you won’t have read elsewhere. Total public spending in cash terms is due to rise from £696.8bn this year to £701.8bn in 2011-12, £713bn in 2012-13, £724.2bn in 2013-14, £739.8bn in 2014-15 and £757.5bn by 2015-16. In nominal terms, spending is going up every year. But such figures don’t adjust for the fact that the purchasing power of sterling keeps on declining. A pound in 2015-16 will be worth less than a pound today. So it makes sense to adjust for inflation. In real terms, total public spending will fall by around four per cent over the period, a smallish but significant and painful decline after years of massive growth. But all of this begs a simple question: what if inflation turns out to be much higher than the Treasury is assuming? Such an outcome would reduce the real value of spending by more than the four per cent described above, thus accelerating the cuts – or it could allow Osborne to spend more in cash terms, thus partly appeasing his critics, while still reducing spending by the same amount in real terms and satisfying the markets. The measure of inflation used to translate cash public spending into real spending is the GDP deflator. It reflects prices of domestically produced goods and services, including investment goods, government services and exports, but does not include the price of imports, unlike measures such as the CPI and RPI. At the moment, the Treasury is assuming inflation on the GDP deflator measure of just 1.9 per cent in 2011-11, down from 2.9 last year. This is a strange assumption to make at a time when all other measures of inflation are soaring. If it were revised up by just one per cent (to 2.9 per cent, like the previous year), an extra £7bn would be cut from real public spending at the stroke of a pen. So this is important. There is another reason why inflation will matter tomorrow, whether Osborne admits it or not. Public sector wages are being frozen for two years for those earning £21,000 or above. The government claimed yesterday this will save £3.3bn a year by 2014-15, but this is based on dubious inflation forecasts. The real value of the cut could be larger than the government admits. Let’s see what Osborne has to say. GIVING YOU A VOICELondon’s business and financial community needs to be heard. That’s why City A.M. – in partnership with top website PoliticsHome – is today relaunching its special panel to gauge our readers’ views. It made a splash during the election campaign; it will do so again this time. Each week, we will send a short smartphone friendly email with a couple of questions to members, and publish the results in the paper. Signing up is easy: if you work in business or finance, go to www.cityam.com/panel to answer a few short questions. The data is completely confidential and will not be shared with any other party – and neither will your responses. We’re giving successful applicants the chance to win a free luxury holiday for two to Paris. In September, we’ll put those panellists who have responded to at least 80 per cent of the surveys into a prize draw. Good [email protected] me on Twitter: @allisterheath by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailTotal PastThe Ingenious Reason There Are No Mosquitoes At Disney WorldTotal PastSerendipity TimesInside Coco Chanel’s Eerily Abandoned Mansion Frozen In TimeSerendipity TimesBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBemoneycougar.comThis Proves The Osmonds Weren’t So Innocentmoneycougar.comautooverload.comDeclassified Vietnam War Photos The Public Wasn’t Meant To Seeautooverload.comElite HeraldExperts Discover Girl Born From Two Different SpeciesElite HeraldPeople TodayNewborn’s Strange Behavior Troubles Mom, 40 Years Later She Finds The Reason Behind ItPeople Today KCS-content Inflation means bigger Budget cuts Tags: NULL Show Comments ▼ whatsapplast_img read more