Tottenham’s new stadium shows why Chelsea should wait for a new home


first_imgEmbed from Getty ImagesChelsea’s new stadium project has been anything but smooth sailing. However, with London rivals Tottenham recently unveiling their new home, the powers that be may want to renew their plans to improve Stamford Bridge. Of course, anything Spurs can do, Chelsea fans will want to see their club do better. However, to match the new White Hart Lane, Roman Abramovich and his team will have to come up with something special.As well as being the second largest stadium in the country, White Hart Lane is, in simple terms, a state-of-the-art masterpiece. At the bottom of the “tech spectrum” are the two 325m² TV screens. Although these aren’t the most impressive pieces of kit inside, they’re nonetheless imposing and produce crystal clear images. Moving up the scale, “bottoms up” technology means staff can now pour 10,000 pints of beer per minute! Yes, even by the hardiest of drinker’s standards, that’s impressive.Spurs leading the way with hi-tech stadiumHowever, while these innovations are great, it’s the connectivity of White Hart Lane that makes it worth the £850-million price tag. In an effort to provide a “connected experience”, developers installed free Wi-Fi in all areas of the stadium. As well as providing internet access, this allows White Hart Lane to be completely cashless. Taking inspiration from online entertainment platforms, the designers wanted real payments to take place without any physical cash changing hands. Although new in the football world, online gaming sites have been using this technology for the last five years.At Genesis Casino in the UK, online gamers can make payments to their account using Boku. Known as a pay-by-mobile option, this process charges deposits to a user’s phone bill. The benefit of this is that they don’t need cash or even their credit card to make payments. By inputting their phone number, they simply have to authorise a charge to their phone bill and the deposit is processed. Now, this ease of payment has been implemented at White Hart Lane, as Tottenham have installed 878 contactless payment points around the stadium. Removing the need for cash, these terminals allow fans to pay for food, drink and even their tickets by tapping their credit/debit card or via Apple Pay.Embed from Getty ImagesWithout the money, it’s not worth pushing for a new stadiumOf course, Chelsea’s stadium plans aren’t all about technology. In May 2018, the club said any developments were on hold because of the “unfavourable investment climate”. Today, things aren’t much better. The current two-window transfer restriction means manager Maurizio Sarri won’t be able to bolster his side in the way he’d like. With only a place in the top five this season as a realistic goal, money may be even harder to come by next season. That being the case, a new stadium may have to wait.Indeed, with Tottenham showing what’s possible in terms of capacity, quality and technology, it would be a huge mistake for Chelsea to cut corners. By rushing a project that’s been talked about since 2015 and not being able to match one of its biggest rivals, Chelsea would attract a host of unwanted criticism. Therefore, even though Stamford Bridge may be in need of a refurb, it seems as though some things are best left until they can be done the right way. Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebookby Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksRecommended for youAspireAbove.comRemember Pauley Perrette? Try Not To Smile When You See Her NowAspireAbove.comUndoLifestly.com25 Celebs You Didn’t Realize Are Gay – No. 8 Will Surprise WomenLifestly.comUndoUsed Cars | Search AdsUsed Cars in Tuen Mun Might Be Cheaper Than You ThinkUsed Cars | Search AdsUndoTopCars15 Ugliest Cars Ever MadeTopCarsUndoezzin.com20 Breathtaking Places to See Before You Dieezzin.comUndoFood World Magazine15 Fruits that Burn Fat Like CrazyFood World MagazineUndoHappyTricks.comHer House Always Smells Amazing – Try her Unique Trick!HappyTricks.comUndoDrhealth35 Foods That Should Never Be Placed in the RefrigeratorDrhealthUndolast_img read more

Cameron in Constitutional Court


first_imgJustice Edwin Cameron addressing the PlenarySession at the 17th International AIDSConference, held in Mexico in August 2008.(Image: International Aids Society) A memorial to the late Aids activist GuguDlamini, killed for making her HIV-positivestatus public. Dlamini was the inspirationfor Cameron’s unveiling of his ownstatus. (Image: Avert)Janine ErasmusA decade after former president Thabo Mbeki blocked his appointment, Judge Edwin Cameron has taken his seat on the Bench of the Constitutional Court, the highest court in South Africa dealing with constitutional matters.President Kgalema Motlanthe announced on 31 December 2008 that Cameron would be the next Constitutional Court judge, taking over the position left by Justice Tholakele “Tholie” Madala, who retired at the end of 2008. Cameron moves into his chambers at the Constitutional Court in Johannesburg in January 2009.Other top judges in the running for the position were Cape High Court Judge Shehnaz Meer, Johannesburg High Court Judge Nigel Willis and Northern Cape Judge President Frans Kgomo.The appointment has also made headlines because Cameron, who turns 56 in February 2009, is openly gay and was the first high-profile public figure in South Africa to reveal that he is HIV-positive. He is well-known and respected as a long-standing activist for the rights of those living with HIV, and has worked tirelessly for many years to combat the discrimination and stigma associated with the disease.The Pretoria-born judge was moved to disclose his HIV status shortly after Aids activist Gugu Dlamini was stoned to death by a gang of boys in her neighbourhood of KwaMancinza, KwaZulu-Natal, for revealing on an isiZulu radio station that she was HIV positive. Her announcement came on 1 December, World Aids Day 1998, and she paid for it with her life. Dlamini had been a volunteer field worker for the National Association of People Living with HIV/Aids.Cameron had lived with the knowledge of his status for three years before disclosing it. In a 2005 interview with UK magazine Positive Nation he said, “I thought, I’m living with the professional and middle-class protections, surrounded by caring friends and family, and I’m not speaking, but this woman did. That’s what compelled me to speak.”For breaking his silence, Cameron in turn was praised by former president Nelson Mandela as one of South Africa’s new breed of heroes.In the same interview Cameron mentioned that he had suffered no negative repercussions whatsoever in his professional or personal life, and was overwhelmed by the love and praise that had poured in for him. He confessed to being puzzled that other public figures had not felt compelled to come out and speak themselves.A superb legal mindEdwin Cameron grew up in Pretoria and after matriculating from Pretoria Boys’ High School and took up studies at Stellenbosch University in the Western Cape. Here he completed a BA in Law followed by a BA Honours in Latin. Later he obtained his LLB through the University of South Africa.Not content with these qualifications, Cameron was awarded a Rhodes Scholarship in 1976 to study at Keble College, Oxford, completing two first-class degrees, a BA Jurisprudence and Batchelor of Civil Law. In 2003 he was made an honorary Fellow of Keble College and in the same year was invited to be a Visiting Fellow of All Souls College at Oxford.Cameron was admitted to the Johannesburg Bar in 1983 and three years later began to practise as a human rights lawyer at the University of the Witwatersrand’s Centre for Applied Legal Studies. His practice included labour and employment law; the defence of African National Congress freedom fighters charged with treason; land tenure and forced removals; objection on conscientious and religious grounds; and gay and lesbian equality.During this time he became active in human rights relating to HIV and Aids, co-founding the Aids Consortium, a national network of NGOs addressing the needs of those suffering with Aids, and founding the Aids Law Project, among other accomplishments. He also co-drafted the Charter of Rights on Aids and HIV, the founding document of the Aids Consortium.In 1994 President Mandela appointed him to the High Court on a temporary basis, where he chaired a commission into illegal arms deals, after which he took up a permanent position in 1995. Since 2000 Cameron has been a justice of the Supreme Court in Bloemfontein. Immediately prior to this appointment he served for a year as an Acting Justice in the Constitutional Court.Between 1998 and 2008 Cameron chaired the Council of the University of the Witwatersrand, the institution’s governing body. His long relationship with Wits includes a seat on numerous University committees as well as the Senate.Former Director of the Wits Centre for Applied Legal Studies, David Unterhalter, has referred to Cameron as ‘”one of the leading lawyers of his generation, possibly the leading lawyer”.Cameron is current General Secretary of the Rhodes Scholarships in Southern Africa. His other roles include patronages of several charitable organisations, among them the Guild Cottage Children’s Home, the Sparrow’s Nest Children’s Hospice, the Community AIDS Response, and the Soweto HIV/Aids Counsellors’ Alliance.Staunch Aids activistCameron has done stellar work in entrenching the rights of gay and lesbian people in the constitutional laws of the country, and fighting against the denial and discrimination associated with HIV and Aids. His outspoken opposition to Thabo Mbeki’s controversial stance of denial towards Aids, and reluctance to make anti-retroviral drugs available to all, earned him the disfavour of the former president. It is believed to have been a significant factor in his failure to gain an appointment to the Constitutional Court.Legal experts today believe that Cameron’s appointment, and that of the new Minister of Health Barbara Hogan, represent a break away from the denialist policies of the past.Cameron is the author of a number of legal books on that subject and others, such as Defiant Desire – Gay and Lesbian Lives in South Africa, and Honoré’s South African Law of Trusts. He has also written treatises on labour and industrial law. In 2005 he put his own experiences down in writing in the book Witness to Aids, which earned him the 2006 Alan Paton award for non-fiction, together with HIV-positive journalist Adam Levin.Among the many tokens of recognition Cameron has received from all over the world are the Nelson Mandela Award for Health and Human Rights in 2000, a special award in 2002 from the Bar of England and Wales in recognition of his work in international jurisprudence and human rights, and the San Francisco AIDS Foundation Excellence in Leadership Award in 2003.For the rights of the peopleThe 11 judges appointed to the Constitutional Court must be independent – they may not be members of Parliament or of any political party, nor may they serve in any governmental role. Candidates are interviewed and then proposed by the Judicial Service Commission, a body that advises the government on matters relating to the administration of justice.The successful candidates are selected by the president, in consultation with the Chief Justice and the National Assembly. Under normal circumstances, judges serve for a non-renewable term of 12 to 15 years, depending on the initial age of the judge when taking up his or her appointment.The first judges took to the Bench in 1994 and were appointed by then president Mandela. Senior counsel and veteran struggle lawyer Arthur Chaskalson was the first president of the Constitutional Court. He was followed by the first four judges, all drawn from the ranks of the Supreme Court – Laurie Ackermann, Richard Goldstone, Tholie Madala and Ismail Mohamed.The remaining six judges were Johann Kriegler, John Didcott, Pius Langa, Kate O’Regan, Yvonne Mokgoro, and Albie Sachs.The Constitutional Court was officially opened by Nelson Mandela in February 1995. “The last time I appeared in court,” said Mandela on that occasion, “was to hear whether or not I was going to be sentenced to death. Today I rise not as an accused, but on behalf of the people of South Africa, to inaugurate a court South Africa has never had, a court on which hinges the future of our democracy.”The Court’s first hearing involved the constitutionality of the death penalty, and after three days of hearings it delivered its judgement that the death penalty was indeed unconstitutional.Do you have queries or comments about this article? Contact Janine Erasmus at [email protected] linksConstitutional CourtSupreme Court of AppealJohannesburg Bar SocietyCentre for Applied and Legal StudiesAids Law ProjectNational Association of People Living with Hiv/AidsWitness to AidsAids Consortiumlast_img read more

Mobile Election Coverage Still Can’t Match TV


first_imgRelated Posts Tags:#2012 election#airplay#Apple TV#iPad#streaming#television A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Call this the first Post-PC U.S. presidential election.Sure, in 2008 we had iPhones and Android was celebrating its first birthday, but the smartphone revolution was just beginning and the iPad was still a gleam in Steve Jobs’ eye.Online TV Has Come A Long WayWe’ve come a long way. But as radically as mobile devices are changing our relationship with media, the experience still has a long way to go before it matches the power and convenience of plain old TV.In 2008, I had a presidential-debate-watching party at my house. As somebody who has never seen the appeal of shelling out hundreds of dollars to a giant corporation for content in which I’m mostly disinterested, I needed a way to get the debate onto my HDTV without subscribing to cable or fidgeting with rabbit ears. Fortunately, CNN.com was streaming the debates between John McCain and Barack Obama for free. I hooked up my MacBook to the back of my TV, fired up CNN.com and got as close as I could to full-screening the video player. The picture wasn’t great, but it worked. This year, the debate live-streaming options were practically limitless. YouTube, Hulu, PBS, Al Jazeera, Huffington Post, CNN and a list of networks and cable channels all offered their own streams, some of them with interactive, social media-fueled components and other bells and whistles. Most of these streams were geared toward desktop browsers, but plenty of outlets crafted their debate-night strategies with our second and third screens in mind. Apple has sold 100 million iPads and competing tablets are popping up constantly. The markets for smart TVs and streaming set top boxes is maturing more slowly, but technologies like Apple’s AirPlay and Google TV’s equivalent hint at an interesting future. It’s amazing how much TV has evolved in the last four years.      Mobile TV Still Has A Long Way To GoStill, as I learned when I sat down to stream the third debate earlier this week, the experience remains far behind the old-fashioned way of watching things on screens. Armed with my iPad and an Apple TV, I sat down on my couch to watch Barack Obama and Mitt Romney argue about foreign policy. At first, it felt flawless. I just AirPlayed my tablet to the TV, launched the CNN iPad app and started watching.But the good times didn’t last. A few minutes in, the stream went black.I checked Twitter and I wasn’t the only one. Others were complaining about issues with CNN’s lifestream, and @CNNMobile tweeted at me and confirmed that they were having issues with mobile streaming. I switched to the Al Jazeera app, but couldn’t get the audio to play (which some people say is the best way to watch a presidential debate). I checked Hulu and the Huffington Post on the iPad, both of which were streaming the debate on their websites, but neither app had a readily-tappable link to the lifestream. At this point, I could have searched the App Store for another news app that was likely to be streaming the debate. But I wasn’t about to start hunting for apps, only able to make educated guesses about who would be streaming to the iPad and then waiting for downloads. The fragile magic of democracy was unfolding in real-time on television screens everywhere and I wasn’t going to miss another minute!Finally, I turned to the browser. NBC was live-streaming the debate on the Web in what was thankfully an iPad-friendly format. I full-screened it, leaned back and watched. Ultimately, the Web came through and worked like a charm. And if I had lined up a stronger arsenal of apps (or owned an XBox 360, or AirPlayed my MacBook to the TV, or used the WSJ Live app on Apple TV, etc.), I might have been able to avoid the hiccups. Still, I couldn’t help but picture my mother. What would she do if she were in my position?People in the technology industry might be accustomed to hunting for livestreams to tune into a live television event. My mother? She sees no reason to fiddle with such nonsense. With traditional TV, you just sit down, turn it on and watch. Internet TV doesn’t yet come close to matching that unquestioned ease of use.So what will watching the debates look like in 2016, when Mitt Romney is debating Joe Biden? Who knows, but given the progress in the last four years, streaming the debates to the Web and mobile devices should be smooth as butter, but getting it to work on your Google Glasses might have a few hiccups. Images courtesy of Shutterstock.center_img john paul titlow Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

Here You Go: All The Samsung Galaxy S4’s Features In One Handy Video


first_imgdan rowinski Related Posts (See also: Samsung Galaxy S4 Revealed: Spectacular Specs & Impressive Features) Tags:#Android#Galaxy S4#Samsung Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Samsung stuffed a lot of features into its latest Galaxy S4. Enough to pack a Broadway play, apparently. With all the new apps, functions, gestures, camera controls and kittenkaboodles, it’s plenty difficult just to figure out what’s actually new and exciting about the Galaxy S4. There’s a good chance that you’re never going to use half of these apps. Others may make you throw your smartphone through a window — say, for instance, if because every time you look away from your phone, the video you were watching stops playing. What is Dual Video Calling anyway? What, exactly, is the deal with all these different camera features?(See also: Samsung, Meet Icarus: Galaxy S4 Features Aim High, Risk Melting Waxy Disappointment)Product pages filled with specs and flashy names (WatchON! ChatOn! Smart Scroll! Drama Shot!) for features don’t really tell the whole story. Sometimes you just need to see things in action.Samsung did us a favor and made this four-minute favor overviewing everything new in the Galaxy S4. Check it out below.What’s the most useful new feature of the Galaxy S4? What’s the most innane? Let us know in the comments. (See also: Samsung Galaxy S4 First Impressions: Beautiful But Bloated [Gallery]) Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologylast_img read more

Will Alberta and BC go to trade war


first_imgIt says a lot about relations between the two provinces that even when they were both governed by the NDP, they still didn’t really get along. And now, of course, Jason Kenney’s United Conservative Party has taken over for Rachel Notley’s party in Alberta-and Notley left a loaded gun on the nightstand when she left, in the form of Bill 12.Bill 12 was passed but never proclaimed, but if it was, it would allow Alberta to choke off oil headed to British Columbia — a move that would effectively cripple the province’s economy — if B.C. doesn’t play ball on support for the Trans Mountain pipeline. If that happens, B.C. would retaliate and the two provinces could find themselves in an escalating trade war. So, is it rhetoric? How would Kenney’s threat become reality? How would B.C. fight back?GUEST: Jason Markusoff, Maclean’sAudio Playerhttp://media.blubrry.com/thebigstory/s/radio.pmd.rogersdigitalmedia.com/podcasts/thebigstory/tbs_04252019.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on iTunes or Google Play.You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.last_img read more